Monday, 28 July 2014
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The Engineer
10 September 2004

  • Not such a disaster

    23 Sep 2004

    A new European system that takes pictures during or after a building collapse due to an earthquake promises to be a lifesaver.

  • Nuclear restructuring

    22 Sep 2004

  • BGA reed relay

    17 Sep 2004

  • Making waves in space

    17 Sep 2004

    US researchers have developed a novel travelling-wave thermoacoustic electric generator for generating electrical power aboard spacecraft.

  • In the pipeline

    16 Sep 2004

  • Infineon guilty of price fixing

    16 Sep 2004

    Infineon Technologies, the German DRAM manufacturer, has agreed to plead guilty and to pay a $160 million fine for participating in an international conspiracy to fix prices in the DRAM market.

  • Single-chip set-top box

    16 Sep 2004

    STMicroelectronics' STi7710 is an integrated single-chip solution that targets designers of high definition set-top boxes.

  • Ultra-wideband comes to miniPCI

    16 Sep 2004

    Freescale Semiconductor and GlobalSun Technology have developed an Ultra-Wide-Band-enabled miniPCI module which will be available in Q4 this year.

  • 32-bit RISC core

    17 Sep 2004

    Cambridge Consultants’ new 32-bit RISC core - the XAP3 - is available in Verilog RTL and can be fabricated in under 50,000 gates in a variety of ASIC and FPGA technologies.

  • RF design and simulation

    15 Sep 2004

    The Mathworks' RF Blockset and RF Toolbox expand the scope of model-based design for wireless system development.

  • I, Robot

    15 Sep 2004

  • VME with a PowerPC

    15 Sep 2004

    Concurrent Technologies has broadened its PowerPC based VME64x product range with the introduction of the VP 742/20x, a single slot board designed around the Motorola MPC7455 PowerPC "G4" processor.

  • It's a steel!

    10 Sep 2004

    To help combat steel distortion in vehicle gearboxes, Corus has developed an alternative.

  • Turtling along

    10 Sep 2004

  • Cat over shallow water

    10 Sep 2004

  • Keeping an eye on river pollutants

    10 Sep 2004

  • Reinvention pays off

    10 Sep 2004

  • Antonov: it's all systems go in Paris

    10 Sep 2004

    Antonov, the company developing new automatic gearbox technology, said it is on course to unveil a car equipped with its latest transmission system at the Paris Motor Show.

  • Marconi back in the black

    10 Sep 2004

    Marconi - best known over the past few years for its ability to lose bucket loads of cash - is now debt free.

  • Big cat

    10 Sep 2004

    A Canadian ferry, whose engine design integrates key technologies, is cutting journey times and getting commuters to give up the roads in favour of water.

  • 100 billion data values

    13 Sep 2004

    Version 9.1 of National Instruments' DIAdem software has a new data plug-in layer, so that engineers can import a wider variety of file types and access more test data than before.

  • Safe-by-wire

    13 Sep 2004

  • Heat-controlled drug implants

    14 Sep 2004

    Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a material that may one day allow patients to receive medication through micro-thin implantable films.

  • Flat screen JV

    14 Sep 2004

    Canon and Toshiba are to establish a joint venture to manufacture flat-screen panels that boast an energy consumption roughly one-half that of large-screen CRTs and about one-third of plasma display panels.

  • Gas gauge

    14 Sep 2004

    Texas Instruments has released a gas gauge technology that calculates remaining capacity in lithium-based battery packs with up to 99% accuracy throughout the entire life of a battery.

  • Linux standard base 2.0

    14 Sep 2004

    The Free Standards Group, a nonprofit organisation dedicated to developing and promoting open source software standards, has announced the availability of the Linux Standard Base 2.0.

  • Handheld drive interface

    15 Sep 2004

    A new initiative to define a storage interface tailored to the unique needs of handheld and portable consumer electronic devices is underway.

  • A defensive move

    15 Sep 2004

    UK defence giant QinetiQ is to buy St Louis, MO-based Westar Aerospace & Defense Group, one of the US's leading providers of aerospace technology solutions, in a £72.2m ($130m) deal.

  • Wheel spin

    10 Sep 2004

  • Fuel cells are stacks cheaper

    10 Sep 2004

  • Mean, green machine

    10 Sep 2004

    The UK developer of an exciting new sports car believes that its creation could redefine the way consumers think about hybrid cars.

  • Earth to Galileo: spread the word

    10 Sep 2004

    Ignorance and misinformation are rife when it comes to satellite positioning. If the EU doesn't get out and publicise how its new system can work, it may not work.

  • Cool operators

    10 Sep 2004

    Developments in cooling technology could be a breath of fresh air for designers of electronic devices.

  • Deep thinking

    10 Sep 2004

    A multi-national submarine rescue system that can be flown anywhere in the world within 72 hours is on the horizon - and it's all thanks to UK technology.

  • The right connections

    10 Sep 2004

    Jon Crowcroft and his Communications Innovation Institute team are out to identify the best ways to apply new technology to ensure the industry is not caught by another 3G-style surprise.

  • Turning on the heat

    10 Sep 2004

    Design flaws believed to be at the root of the 2003 Columbia space shuttle disaster are being addressed by a new NASA concept.

  • Winding up for the challenge

    10 Sep 2004

    Is the renewable technology sector in danger of being shot down before it has a chance to show what it can do?

  • Mixed motives

    10 Sep 2004

    Autodesk's latest CAD release, AIS 9, talks the language of the engineer as well as the professional modeller by providing a risk-free path from 2D to 3D.

  • Buoyant future

    10 Sep 2004

  • Looking for the sunny side

    10 Sep 2004

  • Blending for reinforcements

    10 Sep 2004

  • Carbon dating

    10 Sep 2004

    Carbon sequestration makes sense: technology for it is in place and it could help the UK meet emissions targets. But it will have to happen soon in the North Sea. Julia Pierce reports.

  • Remote control

    10 Sep 2004

    The notion of the car being an extension of the home was reinforced this week by technology developed by BMW to enable drivers to remotely check up on their house.

Digital Edition

The Engineer July Digi Issue

Poll

Should deepening tensions with Russia - and concerns over the impact of economic sanctions - influence the UK's energy policy?

Previous Poll

Europe's largest tidal array in the Pentand Firth off Orkney will eventually generate up to 86MW of power. What will it take for tidal energy to make an appreciable contribution to the UK's energy needs?

Read and comment on the results here

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