Wednesday, 22 October 2014

The Engineer
14 May 2004

  • The day the Beagle died

    27 May 2004

    An official enquiry into the failure of the Beagle 2 Mars lander has found that there were programmatic and organisational reasons that led to a significantly higher risk of failure than otherwise might have been the case.

  • Touch technology

    26 May 2004

  • The intelligent prosthesis

    26 May 2004

    A surgeon from the Scripps Clinic Division of Orthopaedic Surgery in the US has implanted a prosthesis into a patient that has the ability to directly measure forces that occur within the knee.

  • World's smallest power system on a chip

    25 May 2004

  • Making a bridge

    25 May 2004

    Pericom Semiconductor's new PCI-X to PCI-X Bridge IC targets electronic engineers who need to provide bus expansion in their data communication and telecommunication designs.

  • Dedicated chip handles TCP on new adapter

    24 May 2004

    Chelsio Communications claims to the first vendor to deliver a 10Gbit/sec Ethernet adapter that uses a dedicated processor to handle its TCP (Transport Control Protocol).

  • ADSL chipset

    24 May 2004

    Analog Devices' EaglePLUS ADSL2/2plus customer premises equipment (CPE) chipset is claimed to be the first commercially available chipset compliant with the ITU ADSL2/2plus standards.

  • Bookham buys Onetta

    24 May 2004

    Bookham Technology is to acquire Onetta, a Sunnyvale, CA-based developer of intelligent Erbium Doped Fibre Amplifiers for optical communication networks.

  • What a big OLED!

    24 May 2004

  • Breakthrough for bone repair

    20 May 2004

    A breakthrough in polymer development means that soon there may be a radical new treatment for people with broken bones - a special kind of material that can 'glue' the bone back together and support it while it heals.

  • High efficiency amp benefits WCDMA and OFDM designs

    20 May 2004

    Nujira, the Cambridge, UK-based company developing advanced power amplifier technology, is demonstrating a new 20W multi-carrier WCDMA amplifier to its customers.

  • The everywhere phone

    20 May 2004

    A seven-company consortium headed up by Alcatel has been selected to launch BT's Project Bluephone fixed-mobile communication service.

  • Recovery is everywhere

    20 May 2004

  • Driving by the seat of your pants

    14 May 2004

    Auto-engineers are developing car seat sensors to 'nudge' people to take the right turns rather than relying on complicated visual satellite navigation controls. Max Glaskin reports.

  • The meaning of lifecycle

    14 May 2004

    PLM was invented by IBM/Dassault in 2000, yet some vendors claim to have been in the business for the last eight years. Charles Clarke tidies up the definition of this problematic acronym.

  • Crane reaction

    14 May 2004

    An intelligent control system devised as part of an EU project could revitalise European manufacturers' ageing armies of overhead cranes. Christopher Sell reports.

  • Parts time solution

    14 May 2004

    A google-style software tool that searches for 3D shapes rather than words could soon help reduce the design process by months. Richard Fisher reports.

  • Watching brief

    14 May 2004

  • Moving up a gear

    14 May 2004

  • Tightening the net

    14 May 2004

  • Blowing away the national grid

    14 May 2004

  • Getting to the core issue

    14 May 2004

    The decommissioning of the fateful Windscale reactor at Sellafield may not be as hazardous a task as experts have always believed. George Coupe reports.

  • In the driver's seat

    14 May 2004

    As launch head of the UK’s first Automotive Academy, Dr. Nick Barter is charged with honing the skills of the next generation to enter the automotive industry. Andrew Lee reports.

  • Shaping the future

    14 May 2004

    The design of a plasma vessel for a nuclear fusion reactor represents a peculiar set of design challenges. Jon Excell reports.

  • Power to the pylons

    14 May 2004

  • Weight watchers

    14 May 2004

    One of the UK's oldest established car makers is to collaborate in a pioneering R&D project to make a lightweight car chassis from extruded magnesium sections.

  • The way to viable solar power

    14 May 2004

  • Qinetiq production plan fosters sensor teamwork

    14 May 2004

  • Learrnn-ing curve for BAE Systems

    14 May 2004

  • Quantum theory

    14 May 2004

    Quantum computers using components manufactured from 'designer' atoms are a step closer to reality thanks to experiments conducted in the US.

  • How researchers tied carbon nanotubes in knots

    14 May 2004

    Nano-tweezers capable of manipulating materials molecule-by-molecule, paving the way for nano-robots, have been developed in Sweden.

  • Muscling in on shoe design

    14 May 2004

  • Add in graphics

    18 May 2004

    The folks at Nvidia have come up with a graphics interface module specification for PCI Express-based notebooks called the Mobile PCI Express Module (MXM).

  • Worth the weight

    14 May 2004

    The use of titanium suspension springs to save weight and improve performance reaches new heights on Ferrari's Challenge Stradale. Jon Excell reports.

  • Rapid response agents

    14 May 2004

    Helen Knight reports on an automated disaster response system that can assess emergencies and decide how best to deploy rescue services.

  • Warning shot

    14 May 2004

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A project to build a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant in Tunisia to supply the European electricity grid is seeking funding. Is this a feasible concept?