Friday, 28 November 2014

The Engineer
20 February 2004

  • Bearings get an airing

    4 Mar 2004

    A Brunel University spin-out has developed a compressor technology that is lubricated by thin air instead of oil and could squeeze the last few drops from dwindling natural gas resources. Jon Excell reports.

  • Buoyant future

    4 Mar 2004

    Plans in the west country to install an electrical hub on the seabed could provide a much-needed boost for the burgeoning wave power industry.

  • Ford transmission has a brain of its own

    4 Mar 2004

    Ford has developed an automatic four-speed transmission system for its Fiesta and Fusion models, which constantly adapts to provide optimum performance for various driving conditions.

  • Overseas growth drives Ricardo

    4 Mar 2004

    Engineering consultant Ricardo had a torrid time in the UK last year with project cancellations and a shortage of new orders adding up to a miserable end to 2003 for the highly-rated automotive technology specialist.

  • Robotic exoskeleton enhances human strength

    4 Mar 2004

    Robotics researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have developed a self-powered exoskeleton to effectively take the load off people's backs.

  • Stripping the wires

    4 Mar 2004

    A spaghetti junction of wires and connections will vanish from Boeing's next generation of passenger airliners thanks to technology developed by UK engineer Smiths Group.

  • Fluid lenses bring things into focus

    3 Mar 2004

  • Micro-hybrid in transit

    2 Mar 2004

  • 10 Gbit/sec Ethernet over copper

    1 Mar 2004

    The IEEE has put its stamp of approval on a new standard that defines how copper cable can be used with Ethernet systems running at 10 Gbit/sec.

  • Say goodbye to frostbite

    1 Mar 2004

    New gloves developed by a University of Missouri-Columbia researcher can protect hands and fingers in cold winter conditions.

  • CFD in motion

    27 Feb 2004

    Among its new capabilities, Blue Ridge Numerics' CFdesign v7.0 includes a Solid Motion Module that shows the interaction and effects between a physical device and its fluids environment.

  • Thanks for the memory

    24 Feb 2004

    Synopsys, a developer of semiconductor design software, is to acquire Monolithic System Technology and Accelerant Networks in two multi-million dollar deals.

  • Reaching for the moon

    23 Feb 2004

    David Smith has many an engineer's dream job: putting together an infrastructure for Boeing to take man first on a revisit to the Moon, then on to Mars. Rob Coppinger reports.

  • Airships are not a blimp on the horizon

    20 Feb 2004

    For three-quarters of a century the airship has been banished to the book of engineering embarrassments. But give it a chance, says David Windle, and the zeppelin could be a high-flier.

  • All-round radar

    20 Feb 2004

  • Disempowered

    20 Feb 2004

  • DWDM SFP Transceiver

    20 Feb 2004

  • Engine strategy pays off for Rolls-Royce

    20 Feb 2004

  • Stress relief

    20 Feb 2004

  • Pocket of resistance

    20 Feb 2004

  • Shedding a new light on earthquake damage

    20 Feb 2004

  • Making a splash

    20 Feb 2004

    The Splash, developed by Swiss design house Rinspeed, is a one-off concept car that can be driven on the road, through water and - courtesy of hydraulically-powered folding hydrofoils - across the surface of the water.

  • Refining operations

    20 Feb 2004

    With remote monitoring and control via the web becoming more common, it could be the way forward for chemical, pharmaceutical and other process industries to keep tabs on operations. Stuart Nathan reports.

  • Material assets

    20 Feb 2004

    The UK-based Culham Science Centre has been given £48m to prepare for important international decisions on the future of fusion research.

  • Jam warfare

    20 Feb 2004

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LunarMissionOne has launched as a UK-based effort to land a geological investigation probe on the moon, using the Kickstarter crowdfunding website. What are the advantages of funding the mission in this way?