Tuesday, 22 July 2014
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The Engineer
24 September 2004

  • Unfriendly skies

    7 Oct 2004

    After the US went to the WTO complaining about European support for Airbus, the EU counterattacked, citing the 'massive financial subsidies' that the US has granted to Boeing.

  • Honeywell files patent suit

    7 Oct 2004

    Honeywell has filed a lawsuit against 34 electronics companies claiming infringement of a Honeywell patent for technology that improves the appearance of LCD displays.

  • Clearly speedy

    6 Oct 2004

    ClearSpeed Technology has divulged details of its first commercial microprocessor, the really zippy 50 GFLOPS CSX600.

  • Semiconductor sale

    6 Oct 2004

  • CMOS image sensor

    30 Sep 2004

    At the opening day of Photokina in Cologne, Germany, OmniVision Technologies introduced the world's first 5 megapixel CMOS image sensor.

  • Backing ring is a sure fit

    1 Oct 2004

    US bearing giant Timken has developed a universal backing ring for rail car axles that helps to provide an interference fit between the axle dust guard diameter section and the backing ring.

  • Siemens buys the BBC

    1 Oct 2004

    Siemens subsidiary Siemens Business Services has signed a 2.7 billion Euro contract to deliver technology services to the BBC. As part of the deal, Siemens has acquired BBC Technology together with its 1,400 employees.

  • Quantum cryptography comes of age

    1 Oct 2004

    A data archiving network in Geneva claims to be the first to use quantum cryptography technology to secure data transfer.

  • Clock distribution

    4 Oct 2004

  • More wind than anyone else

    5 Oct 2004

    GE Energy is to supply up to 660 wind turbines, with a potential to generate 990MW of electricity, for eight projects in Quebec that will come on line between 2006 and 2012.

  • Pine cone clothes

    5 Oct 2004

  • Cognitive radio

    5 Oct 2004

    Innovative Wireless Technologies aims to develop a 'cognitive radio' software and hardware platform based on a novel radio-frequency IC chipset that allows interoperability across different wireless protocols.

  • On the right wavelength

    24 Sep 2004

  • Safe as sunshine?

    24 Sep 2004

    Far from being a knock to the nanotechnology industry, recommendations that nanoparticles be safety tested could give the UK an edge if we establish a uniform toxicology screening system.

  • Project gives air play to mobiles

    24 Sep 2004

  • Ammonia avenue to hydrogen highway

    24 Sep 2004

    Two US engineering firms claim to have made the most significant step yet towards the mass production of fuel cell-powered cars following the modification of an alkaline propulsion technology.

  • Magnetic attraction

    24 Sep 2004

  • 'Scramjet tester' to launch Down Under

    24 Sep 2004

  • Earth works

    24 Sep 2004

    The military could benefit from a new construction technique that mimics the complexities of termite mounds.

  • A different concept in vehicle design

    24 Sep 2004

  • Flight recorder

    24 Sep 2004

    As an ex-RAF pilot and Red Arrows team leader, and with 6,600 flying hours on his clock, Peter Collins is ideally placed to trial the MoD’s state-of-the-art ASTOR radar system.

  • Buying Uncle Sam

    24 Sep 2004

    There are faint echoes of the cry that launched the American War of Independence in the news that two of our most significant technology companies are building their positions across the Atlantic.

  • All of Homer's life

    27 Sep 2004

    Physicists at Imperial College London are developing a new optical disk with so much storage capacity that every episode of 'The Simpsons' could fit on just one.

  • Wind incentive

    28 Sep 2004

    More wind power can be expected in the US now that the US House and Senate has approved a 1.5 cent-per-kilowatt-hour tax credit for wind power installations.

  • Adiabatic expansion

    28 Sep 2004

    Adiabatic Logic Limited, the Cambridge, UK-based company focused on creating low power technology IP, has received a £500,000 funding boost from the UK Department of Trade and Industry.

  • 1GHz PowerPC on VME

    29 Sep 2004

    Thales Computers has announced the availability of a 1GHz version of its PowerEngine7 series of single-board computers.

  • Look ma, king of the dirt pile

    29 Sep 2004

  • Sounding off

    30 Sep 2004

  • Walking on water

    24 Sep 2004

  • Leaving paper on the shelf

    24 Sep 2004

    BASF is to join forces with Taiwanese company SiPix to develop a display technology that can be rolled up and put into the pocket.

  • The sunny side of solar power

    24 Sep 2004

    Though inclined to find fault with the concept of using the sun as a source of electricity, William Nuttall is coming round to thinking it has a lot of potential compared with other renewables.

  • Calling the shots

    24 Sep 2004

    Despite high-level security measures at airports since September 11, one man and a shoulder-fired missile could still bring down aircraft. Helen Knight reports on moves to counter this continued threat.

Digital Edition

The Engineer July Digi Issue

Poll

Should deepening tensions with Russia - and concerns over the impact of economic sanctions - influence the UK's energy policy?

Previous Poll

Europe's largest tidal array in the Pentand Firth off Orkney will eventually generate up to 86MW of power. What will it take for tidal energy to make an appreciable contribution to the UK's energy needs?

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