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The Engineer
8 October 2004

  • Broadband TV

    21 Oct 2004

    The IEEE has started work on a standard to enable the deployment of wireless regional area networks using unused TV channels.

  • Reducing component count

    21 Oct 2004

  • Putting spam in the slow lane

    20 Oct 2004

    HP Labs researchers have developed an experimental system that can reduce delays to legitimate e-mail caused by an ever-mounting volume of spam and junk messages.

  • To infinity and beyond

    18 Oct 2004

  • Sketch and search

    18 Oct 2004

  • No certification

    15 Oct 2004

    Vendors touted pre-standard technology for 802.11g Wi-Fi devices that later did not meet the standard. But the Wi-Fi Alliance doesn't intend to let it happen again with the new faster 802.11n standard.

  • Cambridge races ahead

    15 Oct 2004

    The Cambridge region in the UK is ahead of the rest of Europe in terms of technology investment, a survey has revealed.

  • Broadband over power lines

    15 Oct 2004

    The US FCC has adopted changes to Part 15 of its rules to encourage the development of Access Broadband over Power Line systems while safeguarding existing licensed services against harmful interference.

  • Bayer fined again

    15 Oct 2004

    Bayer is to pay a $4.7 million criminal fine for participating in a conspiracy to fix the prices of synthetic rubber which is used to manufacture a variety of products including automotive parts.

  • Direct injection

    14 Oct 2004

  • Avionics core

    14 Oct 2004

  • Composite fibres light up

    14 Oct 2004

    Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have created novel optoelectronic fibres that can be woven into a spectrometric fabric.

  • Billion dollar deal

    14 Oct 2004

    Japan's All Nippon Airways has chosen the Rolls-Royce Trent 1000 engine to power its new, flagship fleet of 50 Boeing 7E7 Dreamliners in a deal worth $1 billion.

  • From Russia with wind power

    13 Oct 2004

    US and Russian researchers have teamed up to develop vertical-axis wind turbines - so named because the blades revolve around a vertical axle, like an eggbeater.

  • Synopsys to buy ISE

    12 Oct 2004

    Synopsys is to acquire the Swiss firm of Integrated Systems Engineering, a developer of software products and services for the semiconductor industry, in a $95 million deal.

  • Safe chemicals

    8 Oct 2004

    Impending EU REACH legislation that will force manufacturers to prove that chemicals are safe could have dire consequences for the chemicals industry.

  • We're all going on a starry holiday

    8 Oct 2004

  • Money for particles

    11 Oct 2004

  • Thumbs up for more wind in the UK

    11 Oct 2004

    Over the past week, approval for the construction of over 300MW of new wind power capacity has been granted in Scotland and Wales - three times as much as was built during the whole of last year.

  • Power management for FPGAs

    11 Oct 2004

  • Small guides

    12 Oct 2004

    The new versions of THK's RSR guides have carriages or blocks that measure down to just 4.0 mm in width, suiting them for use in a wide range of miniature or precision applications.

  • Saved by cell-off

    8 Oct 2004

  • UK engine boost

    8 Oct 2004

  • Wind of change

    8 Oct 2004

    A fundamental rethink over the way wind turbines generate electricity could lead to improved efficiency and lower maintenance costs. Jon Excell reports.

  • Heavyweight answer

    8 Oct 2004

    UK company's racing car-style engineering technique claims to improve aerodynamics on trucks - dramatically cutting fuel bills. Jon Excell reports.

  • Composite cohesion

    8 Oct 2004

    With the increasing use of hybrid construction in automotive applications, traditional welding techniques are being replaced by mechanical fastening and adhesive bonding.

  • End of the nuclear winter?

    8 Oct 2004

    The newly created Nuclear Decommissioning Authority will not only clean up the UK's old reactors, it could be just what the industry needs to clean up its public image.

  • EU may go it alone on ITER reactor build

    8 Oct 2004

    The EU would be prepared to go it alone and build an ITER-scale fusion reactor at Cadarache, France, if there is no international agreement on where to locate the prototype.

  • Compound interest

    8 Oct 2004

  • Tailor-made

    8 Oct 2004

    UK companies are investigating technology that will allow motorists to have components custom-made at their local dealership.

  • Flexi-manufacture

    8 Oct 2004

    A consortium of over 30 European companies has received 16m Euros (£11m) of EU funding to break new ground in rapid manufacturing.

  • Easy parker

    8 Oct 2004

  • Brunel and CVM in £4.5m spin-out funding deal

    8 Oct 2004

  • UK can stay in pole position

    8 Oct 2004

  • Security ramp-up boosts TRL

    8 Oct 2004

    TRL Electronics said demand for its products is on the rise in the UK and around the world as countries invest in increasingly sophisticated security and surveillance systems.

  • Good looker

    8 Oct 2004

  • It's OK to use the 'N' word

    8 Oct 2004

    Many are too ready to dismiss nuclear power due to its tarnished image and their prejudices. But maybe it's the best option we have, argues David Windle.

  • Making a key advance

    8 Oct 2004

  • Going for gold

    8 Oct 2004

    Plastic storage containers could soon be manufactured with built-in anti-microbial properties, following the creation of low-cost, polymer-compatible gold and silver nanoparticles.

  • Cold calling

    8 Oct 2004

    The conditions are extreme, the engineering and logistical demands immense - the British Antarctic Survey has put out a challenge for a hi-tech design for its next station. David Fowler reports.

  • Age concern

    8 Oct 2004

    David Leakey, head of Norgren’s European medical division, is addressing a vital issue: the fact that more of us are living longer. Andrew Lee reports.

  • Needs must

    8 Oct 2004

    There is no substitute for formal software training. Not only does it keep you up to pace with advances in technology, it can also improve productivity. Charles Clarke reports.

Digital Edition

The Engineer March Digital Issue

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The roundtable feature in our current issue looks at issues surrounding graduate recruitment into engineering. Which of the solutions proposed in the feature would make the biggest contribution to boosting the number of graduates finding jobs in engineering and remaining there?

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Europe's largest tidal array in the Pentand Firth off Orkney will eventually generate up to 86MW of power. What will it take for tidal energy to make an appreciable contribution to the UK's energy needs?

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