Saturday, 25 October 2014

The Engineer
August 2004 Online

  • NGT sells distribution networks for £5.8 billion

    31 Aug 2004

    National Grid Transco today announced that it has reached an agreement to sell four of its regional gas distribution networks for £5.8 billion.

  • BASF expands polyurethane business

    31 Aug 2004

  • Manufacturers to increase production

    31 Aug 2004

  • Enhancing aerogels

    31 Aug 2004

    Scientists in the US have recently demonstrated a novel method for chemically modifying and enhancing silica-based aerogels without sacrificing the their unique properties.

  • High performance thermal imager

    31 Aug 2004

    The latest portable thermal imager from Land Instruments International is said to be the perfect instrument with which to identify and quantify thermally related problems around the plant.

  • Better nanometre patterns

    31 Aug 2004

    Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology and the US Naval Research Laboratory have developed an improved method for directly writing nanometre-scale patterns onto a variety of surfaces.

  • Turbo Genset fills first clean energy contract

    27 Aug 2004

  • Predicting pollutants in soil

    27 Aug 2004

  • Plug and play

    26 Aug 2004

  • Mining for iron ore

    26 Aug 2004

    BHP Billiton is to form a joint venture with Japan's JFE Steel Corporation, a recently merged entity of Kawasaki Steel Corporation and NKK, to exploit 'pisolite' iron ore from its Yandi mine in Australia.

  • Swap

    26 Aug 2004

    Akzo Nobel is to divest part of its liquid coatings activities to BASF. In a separate deal, Akzo Nobel will acquire BASF Coatings' wood construction business.

  • New advance for artificial joints

    20 Aug 2004

  • BAE Systems awarded $12 million PRISM contract

    20 Aug 2004

    BAE Systems Australia has been awarded over $12 million to deliver an Australian designed and developed radar identification system to the Royal Australian Navy.

  • A better catalyst

    20 Aug 2004

  • Taking charge of molecular wires

    23 Aug 2004

    Scientists in the US have uncovered information that may help "molecular wires" replace silicon in micro-electronic circuits and components in solar energy storage systems.

  • Centrica exercises Langage option

    23 Aug 2004

    Centrica has recently exercised its option to acquire a subsidiary of Carlton Power Limited, which owns land and consents for developing a gas fired power station at Langage, Devon.

  • Stetsons and morphine

    25 Aug 2004

    Dave Wilson goes to Texas, buys a hat, learns a lot about technology and ends up in hospital.

  • Fighting flames

    24 Aug 2004

    PVC could be on the verge of becoming more fire retardant and environmentally friendly, thanks to the work of researchers at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia.

  • Synchronize your clocks

    24 Aug 2004

  • Stopping seizures

    24 Aug 2004

  • Large funds for tiny technology

    24 Aug 2004

    The Department of Trade and Industry has today announced the release of £15 million in funding for 25 nanotechnology projects in the UK.

  • Plastics out, wireless in

    25 Aug 2004

    The UK-based Laird Group has sold its US-based Laird Plastics division and acquired Centurion Wireless in two separate multimillion dollar deals.

  • Putting the 'Phyz' into ultrasound

    25 Aug 2004

  • Colloidal adsorbent removes water hazards

    25 Aug 2004

    Researchers in the US have developed a polymer-based colloidal adsorbent that is said to offer an environmentally friendly and cost-effective way of removing natural organic matter from water supplies.

  • Cisco to acquire P-Cube

    25 Aug 2004

  • Boeing receives $7.35 billion order

    26 Aug 2004

    Singapore Airlines has signed a letter of intent to purchase up to 31 Boeing B777-300 Extended Range aircraft for $7.35 billion.

  • Atomic force microscopy improved

    26 Aug 2004

    A team of researchers has developed a method that could improve the ability of atomic force microscopes to "see" the chemical composition of a sample, follow variations of the sample, as well as map its topographic structure.

  • Dresser-Rand divested

    26 Aug 2004

  • BAE Systems awarded $45 million aircraft protection contract

    26 Aug 2004

    The US Department of Homeland Security has awarded BAE Systems $45 million to develop, test and evaluate a system that protects commercial aircraft against attacks from infrared guided missiles.

  • ABB awarded automation technologies contract

    26 Aug 2004

    ABB has been awarded two orders worth $28 million to supply automation technologies to Norsk Hydro's Ormen Lange gas field off the coast of Norway.

  • Delphi and Parlex form interconnect alliance

    19 Aug 2004

  • Strong resistance in a little package

    19 Aug 2004

  • Northrop awarded $1.04 billion X-47B contract

    20 Aug 2004

    Northrop Grumman has been awarded a contract worth up to $1.04 billion over five years to continue work on the X-47B portion of the Joint Unmanned Combat Air Systems program.

  • Optimised for industrial control

    9 Aug 2004

    Vishay Intertechnology recently released the new MP series of precision thin film resistor divider networks, the first devices to offer 0.05% resistance ratio tolerance in the SC-70 package.

  • Fast1394 for high-speed data acquisition

    9 Aug 2004

    Parvus will soon release its Fast1394 card, a three-port IEEE-1394b controller module designed for high-speed data acquisition across the FireWire bus for audio, video and storage peripherals in embedded computer systems.

  • Scientists help police bust forgers

    10 Aug 2004

  • $75.6 million cueing system

    10 Aug 2004

    Vision Systems International, Elbit Systems' joint venture with Rockwell Collins, has been awarded a $75.6 million contract for over 300 Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing Systems (JHMCS) from Boeing.

  • Slow improvement

    10 Aug 2004

    Manufacturing output growth slowed in the three months to July after a surprisingly strong upturn in the previous six months, but the overall position continues to improve in most regions of the UK.

  • Making maps

    10 Aug 2004

  • Motoring toward greater efficiency

    10 Aug 2004

    GE Global Research, Sensicast Systems and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute are to collaborate on a three-year, $6 million project to improve the efficiency of electric motors.

  • Handheld spectrum analyser

    10 Aug 2004

  • Terra expands with $268 million acquisition

    10 Aug 2004

    Terra Industries announced recently that it has reached an agreement to purchase the troubled Mississippi Chemical Corporation for approximately $268 million.

  • The parable of the lost son found

    11 Aug 2004

    Dave Wilson found himself in a local hostelry discussing the impact of new technological developments with his colleagues.

  • Darkness on the edge of town

    16 Aug 2004

    Dave Wilson discusses how changes in technology can make winners out of us all - as long as we have the right attitude.

  • Listen to your heart

    11 Aug 2004

    Researchers in the US have developed an implantable electronic device that could send early-warning signals to doctors before heart rhythm problems arise.

  • Electron in a spin

    11 Aug 2004

    Scientists in the US have demonstrated the ability to detect the spin of a single electron in a standard silicon transistor.

  • Stiff tissue

    11 Aug 2004

  • Better insight for stars of track and field

    11 Aug 2004

    Cambridge Consultants has created Technospecs, a head-mounted monitoring and display device that could help athletes optimise their training and performance without the need for sensors and cumbersome wrist displays.

  • Chilling in China

    11 Aug 2004

    Honeywell today announced plans to build a manufacturing plant for non-ozone depleting refrigerant products in Qingpu, China. The new facility is expected to be operational in November 2004.

  • Forming building blocks for nanomachines

    12 Aug 2004

    Microscopic scaffolding to house the tiny components of nanotech devices could be built from RNA, the same substance that shuttles messages around a cell's nucleus.

  • Network could operate 100 times faster

    12 Aug 2004

  • Improving interfaces

    12 Aug 2004

    Researchers in the US have patented a method that creates smooth and strong interfaces between metals and metal oxides without high-temperature brazing.

  • $57 million for Fluor

    12 Aug 2004

    Fluor Corporation has today been awarded $57 million by Statoil to implement the Export Capacity Upgrading Project at the Kollsnes Gas Terminal, Norway.

  • New ESD protection array

    12 Aug 2004

    Vishay has recently released a new ESD protection array that integrates an EMI filter in a leadless LLP75 package optimised for space-critical applications.

  • Fine forecast for freight

    13 Aug 2004

  • America West confirms Airbus order

    13 Aug 2004

    America West has placed a new order for ten A320s and seven A319s, confirming a commitment announced by the airline in May 2004.

  • Emerson awarded $27 million

    13 Aug 2004

    Emerson Process Management has won a $27 million contract to serve as general automation contractor for a $2.6 billion oil sands extraction project in Canada.

  • Shedding new light on biology

    13 Aug 2004

    Physicists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) have developed a microscope that gives scientists a much deeper look into living organisms than before.

  • Alcatel expands in Laos

    16 Aug 2004

    Alcatel announced today that it has been awarded $24 million by Enterprise of Telecommunications Laos (ETL) to upgrade its nationwide telecom network.

  • Industry's fastest write and rewrite speeds

    16 Aug 2004

    National Semiconductor Corporation has today launched the LMH6533, its newest laser diode driver (LDD) for use in optical pickup units (OPUs).

  • Rolls-Royce to power new spy plane

    16 Aug 2004

    Rolls-Royce has been selected to provide engines for the five Embraer ERJ 145 aircraft recently selected for the US Army's next-generation Aerial Common Sensor reconnaissance aircraft.

  • BAE Systems to supply autopilot controls

    16 Aug 2004

    The US Navy has awarded BAE Systems $41.9 million for the purchase of Digital Autopilot Systems that will be used to upgrade 120 P-3 Orion maritime patrol aircraft.

  • Goodrich contract could exceed $100 million

    16 Aug 2004

    Goodrich has been selected by Sikorsky to provide the Integrated Vehicle Health Management System (IVHMS) for the US Army's UH-60M Black Hawk program.

  • A pause in recovery

    16 Aug 2004

    Smaller manufacturers have seen the pace of recovery slow since the start of the summer, according to the latest CBI quarterly survey of small and medium-sized companies.

  • Intelsat bought for $5 billion

    17 Aug 2004

    Intelsat, a global satellite communications provider, announced yesterday that it is to be acquired by Zeus Holdings for approximately $5 billion.

  • $25 million for toxin detectors

    17 Aug 2004

    General Dynamics Armament and Technical Products has been awarded an initial $25 million by the US Army for the production of Joint Biological Point Detection Systems.

  • Low-cost CFII-IDE adapter

    17 Aug 2004

  • Carbon nanotubes go with the flow

    17 Aug 2004

    Researchers in the US have discovered that adding carbon nanotubes to a common commercial polymer leads to dramatic changes in how the molten polymer flows.

  • Light-activated glue clamps workpieces in a flash

    17 Aug 2004

    An engineer at Penn State University has developed a new technology that uses light-activated glue to hold workpieces in position for machining, grinding and other manufacturing processes.

  • Boeing signs MD-11 order

    18 Aug 2004

    Boeing has announced an order to convert four additional MD-11 passenger airplanes to freighters for Bermuda-based Central Air Leasing.

  • $14 million for solar cell development

    18 Aug 2004

    Nanosys has today been awarded a contract worth up to $14 million over five years to support the development of flexible low cost solar cells.

  • Darkness on the edge of town

    18 Aug 2004

    Dave Wilson discusses how changes in technology can make winners out of us all - as long as we have the right attitude.

  • Driving changes on the grid

    18 Aug 2004

    Researchers in the US believe that electric-drive cars will be capable of supplying up to 20 percent of the power required by the electricity grid in North America by 2050.

  • Luna introduces Optical Backscatter Reflectometer

    19 Aug 2004

  • Sticky self-assembly

    19 Aug 2004

    University of Michigan researchers have discovered a way to self-assemble nanoparticles using sticky patches that make the particles group themselves together in programmed ways.

  • Siemens awarded drive technology contract

    19 Aug 2004

    Siemens has landed an order from Voest Alpine Industrieanlagenbau to supply the drive technology for hot-galvanising plants in the new cold rolling mill of Benxi Iron&Steel in China.

  • Boom time for batteries

    19 Aug 2004

    According to a soon-to-be-released report, the US market for large and advanced batteries was worth $2.9 billion in 2003 and is set to reach $4.5 billion in 2008.

  • New advance in gallium nitride nanowires

    2 Aug 2004

    A team of scientists has made a significant breakthrough in the development of the semiconductor gallium nitride as a building block for nanotechnology.

  • A new way of seeing

    2 Aug 2004

    A prototype microscope that uses neutrons instead of light to 'see' magnified images has been demonstrated at the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

  • One hour lab

    2 Aug 2004

    A biomedical engineer has created palm-sized "laboratories" that require no assembly, contain no electronics and are powerful enough to detect botulinum neurotoxin in a tiny drop of blood.

  • £50 million renewables boost

    2 Aug 2004

    Patricia Hewitt, Secretary of State for Trade and Industry, today announced a £50 million fund to develop wave and tidal stream power as a potential source of renewable energy.

  • Generating and analyzing waveforms

    2 Aug 2004

  • $30 million for particulate pollution study

    2 Aug 2004

    Researchers at the University of Washington have been awarded $30 million by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to explore the connection between air pollution and cardiovascular disease.

  • Air pollution: a global issue

    3 Aug 2004

  • Power from plankton

    3 Aug 2004

    Scientists have tapped the chemical reactions from decomposing organic matter on the ocean floor to create fuel cells that can provide low levels of electrical power.

  • BAE Systems awarded $80 million

    3 Aug 2004

  • CRM market to surpass $11 Billion by 2008

    3 Aug 2004

    According to IDC, the worldwide CRM software applications market will reach $11.4 billion in revenues by 2008.

  • Improving GPS/AGPS receivers

    4 Aug 2004

    Fujitsu has introduced a new chipset to help designers develop high-sensitivity GPS/AGPS receivers. The chipset support telematics and navigation applications for mobile location, tracking and monitoring.

  • Surging semiconductor sales

    4 Aug 2004

    Global semiconductor sales hit $17.8 billion in June, a sequential increase of 2.8 percent from the $17.3 billion reported in May and a 40.3 percent increase from June of 2003.

  • From Spitfire to surgery

    4 Aug 2004

    Researchers are using a test devised in the 1930s, and used to gauge the stress on Spitfire superchargers, to model the stress that surgical procedures put on an aortic aneurysm.

  • Alstom to keep Madrid moving

    4 Aug 2004

    Mintra, the public company responsible for transport infrastructure in Madrid, has chosen Alstom to build 70 CITADIS vehicles for the city's new light rail network.

  • No batteries required

    4 Aug 2004

    Dave Wilson explains how a 'potato powered' LCD clock excited some young children a long long time ago.

  • RFID goes to hospital

    5 Aug 2004

    As part of a pilot project at the Jacobi Medical Center in New York, more than 200 patients are wearing RFID enabled wristbands that allow their patient records to be accessed wherever they might be in the hospital.

  • Virgin places $5.5 billion Airbus order

    5 Aug 2004

    In a deal worth more than $5.5 billion, Virgin Atlantic Airways is to take delivery of thirteen new A340-600 aircraft with options for a further thirteen.

  • PCB inspection and verification

    5 Aug 2004

  • Reading TEDS

    5 Aug 2004

  • Making dots

    9 Aug 2004

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