Saturday, 20 December 2014
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Supercapacitor could shrink size of mobile electronics

Scientists have created a supercapacitor that could help electronics designer create mobile phones and cameras that are smaller, lighter and thinner than currently possible.

The power supply measures less than half a centimetre across and is made from a flexible material, opening up the possibility for wearable electronics. The research is published in the Royal Society of Chemistry journal Energy & Environmental Science.

Reducing the size of portable electronic devices requires power supplies to be shrunk along with an increase in the flexibility of power supplies in electronic circuits. Supercapacitors are attractive power supplies because they can store almost as much energy as a battery, with the advantage of high-speed energy discharge. Supercapacitor electrodes are normally made from carbon or conducting polymers, but these can be relatively costly.

A team led by Prof Oliver G Schmidt at the Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research in Dresden (IFW-Dresden) examined the use of manganese dioxide as an alternative electrode material, which is less expensive than the standard materials.

Manganese dioxide is not very electrically conductive, nor is it naturally flexible or strong. However, the scientists overcame this by vaporising the manganese dioxide using an electron beam and then allowing the gaseous atoms to precipitate into thin, bendy films. They incorporated very thin layers of gold into the films to improve the electrical conductivity of the material.

Tests on the new micro-supercapacitor showed that the tiny, bendy power supply can store more energy and provide more power per unit volume than supercapacitors available today.

In a statement, Dr Chenglin Yan, leader of the research group at IFW-Dresden, said, ‘Supercapacitors, as a new class of energy device, can store high energy and provide high power, bridging the gap between rechargeable batteries and conventional capacitors. So we thought a micro-supercapacitor would be an important development in the rapid advance of portable consumer electronics, which need small lightweight, flexible micro-scale power sources.

‘The device could be applied to many miniaturised technologies, including implantable medical devices and active radio frequency identification (RFID) tags for self-powered miniaturised devices.’

The next step in the team’s research is finding a cheaper alternative to gold to improve the conductivity of the micro-supercapacitor.


Readers' comments (3)

  • "good conductivity"..."cheaper than gold".... sounds like another job for Graphene.

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  • Very good initiative and the Cheaper than gold option is quite attractive. Suggest for usage of silica based compounds considering plenty of available raw material availability.

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  • Silver is much cheaper and better than gold, silver is one of the best conductors. I am not that familiar with or have heard much about research into nano-silver products but believe that this line of research would be very rewarding.

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