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The Engineer
June 2004 Online

  • Analysis goes wireless

    30 Jun 2004

  • Buying into the WAN

    30 Jun 2004

    Cisco Systems has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Los Gatos, California-based Actona Technologies, a developer of wide-area file services software, for $82 million.

  • All the way to the bank

    30 Jun 2004

    Dave Wilson went back to University last week to study why specialisation at an early age might not be a bad thing.

  • Solid Edge targets process industry

    30 Jun 2004

  • Keeping computers quiet

    29 Jun 2004

    Brigham Young University physics professor Scott Sommerfeldt has created a noise suppression system that can reduce the whirl of office equipment cooling fans to a soft whisper.

  • Gesticulating for blood sugar measurements

    29 Jun 2004

    Researchers at Penn State University have developed a new under-skin sensor that monitors blood sugar levels with a wave of the arm.

  • Polymer modifier

    29 Jun 2004

    DuPont's Fusabond AEB-560D is a new copolymer that will help compounders boost toughness and incorporate glass fibre and other fillers into a wide range of plastics.

  • Handing it over

    29 Jun 2004

  • Finnair places $320 million order

    30 Jun 2004

    Finnair announced today that it has placed a $320 million order for 12 76-seat Embraer 170 jet aircraft, with options for another eight.

  • BAE Systems awarded Chinook contract

    30 Jun 2004

    Boeing has selected BAE Systems to develop the digital flight control computer for the newest version of the US Army's CH-47 Chinook heavy-lift transport helicopter.

  • Bahrain goes ballistic for radar system

    30 Jun 2004

  • Nanoshells kill cancer

    30 Jun 2004

    A revolutionary new form of cancer therapy in development at Rice University has proven effective at eradicating tumours in laboratory animals during the first phase of animal testing.

  • Chilling effect of iron supplement

    24 Jun 2004

    Scientists at NIST have discovered that a pinch of iron boosts the cooling performance of a material considered key to the development of magnetic refrigerators.

  • Uniting incompatible databanks

    24 Jun 2004

  • Ethernet switch for all seasons

    24 Jun 2004

    Canoga Perkins has announced the release of the new HS8000, a new temperature-hardened, managed Ethernet switch for harsh environments.

  • Steering clear of mines

    24 Jun 2004

    QinetiQ has unveiled the Diver Reconnaissance System, a new underwater navigation and search system that will increase the effectiveness of mine clearance divers.

  • Boeing develops a sense for Goodrich

    24 Jun 2004

    Boeing has selected Goodrich Corporation to supply the Proximity Sensing System for the new Boeing 7E7 Dreamliner passenger aircraft.

  • Danger: blast area

    25 Jun 2004

    Novel optical sensors that can withstand the extreme environments within an explosion or a jet engine simulation rig are now being developed in the UK.

  • UK pledges £15 million for nuke clean up

    25 Jun 2004

  • Detecting the extra

    25 Jun 2004

    A Loughborough University researcher has teamed up with scientists from Italy to develop a unique optical fingerprinting system to detect extra virgin oil from the fakes.

  • No threat yet

    28 Jun 2004

  • Ethanol from waste

    29 Jun 2004

    The first license for a strain of yeast developed at Purdue University that makes ethanol from agricultural residues more effectively has been issued to biotechnology company Iogen.

  • Powertrain pact

    29 Jun 2004

  • National Grid makes $2 billion acquisition

    29 Jun 2004

    Crown Castle International has signed a definitive agreement to sell its UK subsidiary to National Grid Transco for $2.035 billion in cash.

  • Shaking it in China

    29 Jun 2004

    Renault plans to join forces with the Chinese Dongfeng Motor Company to form a joint venture company in China that will make 300,000 Renault automobiles a year for the Chinese market by 2006.

  • Microsoft settles antitrust lawsuit

    29 Jun 2004

    In one of the largest antitrust lawsuits to date, Microsoft has agreed to settle with another US state in a class-action case that alleged claims of violation of antitrust laws.

  • AMEC wins key nuclear clean-up contract

    29 Jun 2004

    AMEC is to use its GeoMelt technology for the next stage of the world's largest environmental clean-up project at the massive US nuclear weapons site in Hanford, Washington.

  • New chip is easy on the eye

    29 Jun 2004

    Stanford University researchers have developed a prototype for a new kind of implantable chip that could be adapted to serve as a prosthetic retina or a drug-delivery system.

  • Cheaper MFC produces more electricity

    16 Jun 2004

    Engineers have made a modification to their prototype microbial fuel cell (MFC), making the device less costly and capable of producing six times more electricity from domestic wastewater.

  • Vienna places 357 million Euro tram order

    16 Jun 2004

    Siemens Transportation and consortium partner, Elin have been awarded 357 million Euros to supply 150 ultra-low-floor trams to the Viennese transit operator Wiener Linien.

  • UAVs at sea

    16 Jun 2004

    Northrop Grumman has successfully demonstrated a shipboard mission control system that will allow unmanned combat aerial vehicles (UAVs) to operate on board aircraft carriers.

  • Capturing your thoughts

    16 Jun 2004

    A team led by University of California neurobiologists has developed an approach to interpreting brain electroencephalograms that provides an unprecedented view of thought in action.

  • The road to China

    16 Jun 2004

    With manufacturers outsourcing everthing from machined components to cargo doors to China, Dave Wilson asks what might be manufactured there next?

  • Boeing awards billions to Smiths Aerospace

    17 Jun 2004

    The UK's Smiths Aerospace has been awarded $1.6 billion to supply the landing gear and high lift actuation systems for Boeing's new 7E7 passenger aircraft.

  • VME rivals no more

    17 Jun 2004

    Motorola is to acquire Force Computers, the embedded computing business presently owned by Solectron Corporation, for an undisclosed sum.

  • Terahertz light to help end terror

    17 Jun 2004

    Smiths Detection and TeraView are to co-develop a next-generation hand-held security wand that utilises terahertz light waves to detect and identify weapons concealed beneath clothing.

  • PXI switch

    17 Jun 2004

  • Wind power on the increase in Italy

    17 Jun 2004

    Enel SpA, the largest electric utility in Italy, has signed an agreement with US wind giant GE Energy to purchase 71 of GE's 1.5MW wind turbines during 2004 and 2005.

  • Atmos Energy acquires gas in Texas

    17 Jun 2004

  • NASA awards BAE Systems $20 million

    17 Jun 2004

    BAE Systems has received a $20 million contract to design the Hyperspectral Environmental Suite, a new atmospheric sounding/coastal water imaging instrument for NASA.

  • Seeing further with fibre

    17 Jun 2004

    Fujitsu Telecommunications Europe has won a multi-million pound contract to supply new long-distance optical fibre links for the e-MERLIN large-array radio astronomy project.

  • Alcatel and Finmeccanica form space alliance

    18 Jun 2004

    Alcatel and Finmeccanica today signed a memorandum of understanding to merge their space activities and form alliances in the space sector through the creation of two sister companies.

  • Putting lasers in the shade

    18 Jun 2004

    University of Central Florida researchers are developing an eyeglass-like device that would react quickly enough to prevent laser beams from blinding soldiers and pilots.

  • Hitting new highs

    18 Jun 2004

    According to iSuppli Corp, the semiconductor industry hit the 'sweet spot' in 2004, with supply and demand aligning to generate strong growth.

  • Bound by gold

    18 Jun 2004

    "Nanodumbells" - gold-tipped nanocrystals which can be used as highly efficient building blocks for devices in the emerging nanotechnology industry - have been developed by researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

  • Fresh mesh

    18 Jun 2004

    A US computer scientist has created a new algorithm to compress the large files that represent 3-D shapes used in animations, video games and other computer graphics applications.

  • Printable silicon for electronic systems

    18 Jun 2004

    By carving specks of single crystal silicon from a bulk wafer and casting them onto sheets of plastic, scientists have demonstrated a route to ultrahigh performance, mechanically flexible thin-film transistors.

  • English waste, Irish sea

    21 Jun 2004

    BNFL has been slapped on the wrists over its failure to properly maintain pipelines at its Sellafield plant that are used to discharge low level radioactive waste into the Irish Sea.

  • Broadband PON on a chip

    21 Jun 2004

    Freescale Semiconductor has unveiled what it claims is the industry's first system-on-chip solution for broadband passive optical networking.

  • Cisco Systems pockets Procket

    21 Jun 2004

    Cisco Systems is to purchase the intellectual property, a majority of the engineering team and select assets from privately-held Procket Networks for $89 million.

  • Cypress buys CMOS sensors

    22 Jun 2004

  • GaAs HBT for demanding phones

    22 Jun 2004

    RF Micro Devices has announced the availability of its series of gallium arsenide heterojunction bipolar transistor driver power amplifiers for cellular base station infrastructure applications.

  • World´s first 16 Mbit MRAM

    22 Jun 2004

    Infineon Technologies and IBM have presented what they describe as the world's first 16 Mbit Magnetoresistive Random Access Memory (MRAM).

  • Redefining power laser diodes

    22 Jun 2004

  • Not going green

    23 Jun 2004

    Government emphasis on voluntary environmental action is unlikely to have a significant effect on the environmental practices of SMEs, according to researchers at Kingston University, Surrey.

  • Nanocrystals light the way

    23 Jun 2004

    A wireless nanodevice that functions like a fluorescent light has been developed in a joint project between researchers at Los Alamos and Sandia national laboratories.

  • Tunis rides with Alstom trams

    23 Jun 2004

    The Société du Métro Léger de Tunis (SMLT) has announced the provisional award to Alstom of an order worth 80 million Euros for 30 CITADIS tramways.

  • Breath tests to diagnose disease

    23 Jun 2004

  • Bowling robots into battle

    24 Jun 2004

    Researchers in the US have developed Dragon Runner, a small, hand-deployed remote-controlled prototype robot designed for military surveillance in urban settings.

  • Silencing jumbos and hawks

    24 Jun 2004

    Ohio State University researchers have developed a silencer technology that creates electrical arcs to control turbulence in aircraft engine exhaust airflow, the chief cause of engine noise.

  • Siemens sells wafer inspection business

    10 Jun 2004

    ICOS Vision Systems Corporation, a supplier of inspection solutions for the semiconductor industry, today announced it has acquired the wafer inspection business of Siemens.

  • Calm during the storm

    10 Jun 2004

    A NASA developed technology that can automatically alert pilots of potentially dangerous turbulence will soon make its first evaluation flights on a commercial airliner.

  • Israel orders extra double-deck cars

    10 Jun 2004

    Israel Railways has today exercised options on a contract for 54 additional double-deck cars from Bombardier Transportation, which is set to make 78 million Euros from the order.

  • Alcatel to build Chinasat 9

    11 Jun 2004

    Alcatel today signed a contract with China Satellite Communication Corporation to design and produce a new-generation communications satellite, Chinasat 9.

  • TA-Series launched

    11 Jun 2004

  • Boeing awarded $86 million JHMCS contract

    14 Jun 2004

  • MoD orders submarine rescue craft

    14 Jun 2004

    Rolls-Royce has been awarded £47 million by the UK Ministry of Defence to provide and operate a specialist, unmanned craft capable of rescuing submarine crews.

  • Irregularities at ABB

    14 Jun 2004

  • Home automation

    14 Jun 2004

    Smarthome's 'Insteon' is a new home automation network that combines a home's existing wiring, or powerline, with radio frequency communications.

  • Injectors: made in China

    14 Jun 2004

  • GE to supply turbines for Portuguese wind farm

    14 Jun 2004

    GE Energy will supply nine of its 1.5-megawatt wind turbines for the Parque Eólico de Alagoa de Cima project, a new wind farm in northwestern Portugal.

  • Defence team lands $3.89 billion aircraft deal

    15 Jun 2004

    The US Navy has awarded a Boeing-led industry team a $3.89 billion contract to build seven Multi-mission Maritime Aircraft (MMA).

  • Chinese power link

    15 Jun 2004

  • Rolls-Royce to power new navy ship

    15 Jun 2004

    Rolls-Royce has been selected by Lockheed Martin to provide MT30 gas turbine engines and waterjets for up to two of the US Navy's Littoral Combat Ship programme (LCS).

  • Bio-refinery reduces build-up of greenhouse gases

    15 Jun 2004

  • Roughing up implants

    15 Jun 2004

  • BTTB orders $41 million mobile network

    15 Jun 2004

    Bangladesh's state-owned mobile operator, BTTB has signed a $41 million contract with Siemens mobile to set up a mobile network in key districts of the country.

  • Jump-starting human embryonic stem cell work

    15 Jun 2004

    An MIT team has developed new technology that could jump-start scientists' ability to create specific cell types from human embryonic stem cells.

  • China's auto suppliers could face bumpy road

    15 Jun 2004

  • Virgin orders Airbus aircraft

    16 Jun 2004

    Virgin America yesterday ordered 18 Airbus aircraft, including 11 A319s and seven A320s. The airline will also lease 15 A320 aircraft from GE Capital Aviation Services.

  • NEC division guilty of fraud

    1 Jun 2004

    NEC-Business Network Solutions, a subsidiary of NEC America, is to pay a $20.6 million fine after pleading guilty to charges of collusion and wire fraud in the Federal Communications Commission's E-Rate program.

  • Done deal for dyes

    1 Jun 2004

    BASF, Bayer and Hoechst announced last week that they are to sell their textile dyes joint venture, DyStar, to Platinum Equity for an undisclosed fee.

  • Old fashioned profits from unconventional oil

    1 Jun 2004

    According to a report due for release from Business Communications Company the demand for unconventional oil will reach 10.31 million barrels in 2008, up from 8.59 million barrels in 2003.

  • $100 million subcon contract for BAE Systems

    1 Jun 2004

    BAE Systems has been selected by Turkey as the key subcontractor for an integrated electronic self-protection system to be installed on Turkey's F-16 fighters.

  • DuPont brushes-up with filament JV

    1 Jun 2004

    DuPont and Wuxi Xingda Nylon of Wuxi, China, have completed the formation and start-up of a joint venture for the production and distribution of filaments used in brushes.

  • Million dollar lasers

    1 Jun 2004

    Newport Corporation signed a definitive agreement today with Thermo Electron Corporation to purchase Spectra-Physics for $300 million.

  • Kiwis board with Boeing

    2 Jun 2004

    Air New Zealand today signed agreements worth $849 million to acquire eight new Boeing 777-200 ER and two Boeing 7E7 aircraft, plus options for a further 42 long-haul aircraft.

  • Revenue goes up in smoke

    2 Jun 2004

    A new study reveals that 54 percent of UK companies face large fines because they are not ready to comply with new European Union regulations on CO2.

  • The Day After Tomorrow

    2 Jun 2004

    If you think that the weather is bad right now, it's nothing compared to what it could be. Dave Wilson explains.

  • Power plant pollution

    2 Jun 2004

    A new report claims that electric power plants are the number one toxic air polluter in North America, accounting for almost half of all industrial air emissions.

  • GE Energy gets air quality control

    3 Jun 2004

    GE Energy has signed a definitive agreement to acquire BHA Group Holdings, a provider of air quality control products and services, in a cash transaction worth approximately $260 million.

  • Fighting fire with Novec

    3 Jun 2004

  • On the border

    3 Jun 2004

    In a deal that could be worth $10 billion, a team of companies led by Accenture has been selected to design and develop a high-tech security system that will be deployed at US borders.

  • Baking your body

    3 Jun 2004

  • DuPont acquires $64 million plant sciences company

    3 Jun 2004

    DuPont today signed an agreement to acquire California-based plant sciences company, Verdia for $64 million in cash.

  • No merger now

    3 Jun 2004

  • Giving in to IT

    3 Jun 2004

    According to AMR Research, manufacturing companies are finally increasing investments needed to achieve their supply chain objectives after years of caution.

  • Network booting supported over Ethernet

    3 Jun 2004

    Parvus Corp today announced the availability of a free network booting utility for users of its SpacePC PC/104 form-factor single board computers (SBCs).

  • Protein engineered to detect nerve gas

    4 Jun 2004

    Biochemists at Duke University Medical Centre, North Carolina have used computational design to engineer and construct a protein that could sense the nerve agent soman.

  • CBI doubts EU proposals

    4 Jun 2004

  • Scottish university to develop artificial corneas

    4 Jun 2004

    An engineering team at the University of Dundee has secured funding to work with European colleagues on the construction of artificial corneas.

  • Driven by $30 million order

    4 Jun 2004

    Siemens has received a $30 million order from China's Taiyuan Iron & Steel Company to equip five reversing cold rolling stands with drive and automation systems.

  • Understanding geriatric gadgets

    4 Jun 2004

    A team of scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Argonne National Laboratory have unlocked the secrets of memory loss in electronic devices.

  • Pressure switches

    7 Jun 2004

    Motion and fluid control specialist Norgren has expanded its range of pressure switches to include two new models.

  • Sorting with speed and precision

    7 Jun 2004

    Princeton scientists have invented a device that rapidly sorts microscopic particles into extremely fine gradations of sizes, opening a range of potential uses.

  • Connecting networks

    7 Jun 2004

    Quake Technologies today announced the availability of the QT2030 - a 10Gbit/sec serial-to-XAUI PHY device for Ethernet and Fibre Channel LAN and WAN applications.

  • Charge pump

    7 Jun 2004

    Analog Devices' ADM8845 charge pump regulator is designed to deliver accurate backlighting in micro colour TFT LCDs used in cell phones, PDAs and digital cameras.

  • MEMS for consumers

    7 Jun 2004

  • "Brain-based" control for unmanned vehicles

    7 Jun 2004

    This summer, a mobile autonomous research vehicle fitted with an agile "brain-based" controller will attempt to smoothly and quietly manoeuvre itself in and out of a docking tube.

  • Quantum cryptography network delivers absolute security

    8 Jun 2004

    The world's first operational network to use quantum cryptography is now operational beneath the streets of Cambridge, MA in the US.

  • Superconductor mystery unfurled

    8 Jun 2004

    Scientists in the US have found evidence to prove why adding a small amount of calcium to a common high-temperature superconductor significantly increases the amount of electric current the material can carry.

  • PET bottle recycling breaks new records

    8 Jun 2004

  • Wireless infrastructure acquired

    8 Jun 2004

  • Parker buys Mead Fluid Dynamics' UK arm

    8 Jun 2004

    Parker Hannifin has purchased the assets of Mead Fluid Dynamics Ltd., the UK-based subsidiary of Chicago-based Mead Fluid Dynamics, for an undisclosed amount.

  • Burning waste-coal refuse

    8 Jun 2004

    A new $215 million joint-venture between the US Department of Energy and Western Greenbrier Co-Generation is to develop a new low-emissions power plant that will use waste-coal to generate electric power.

  • $40 million automation in China

    9 Jun 2004

  • Sensing the weather

    9 Jun 2004

    ITT Industries has won a $20 million contract to develop an advanced sensor that will improve forecasters' ability to predict where and when severe storms will strike.

  • Students hunt for land mines

    9 Jun 2004

    Four Johns Hopkins University undergraduate engineering students have designed and built a remote-controlled robotic vehicle that finds land mines in rugged terrain and marks their location with paint.

  • Opening up the brain

    9 Jun 2004

    Dave Wilson examines why the full-scale deployment of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) systems might signal the end for dating agencies.

  • Alcatel to supply signals and controls

    9 Jun 2004

  • New device puts particles in line

    9 Jun 2004

    Princeton University scientists have invented a device that rapidly sorts microscopic particles into extremely fine gradations of sizes, opening a range of potential uses.

  • Alstom to lead Algerian electrification

    10 Jun 2004

    The national Algerian railway company, SNTF, has recently awarded an Alstom-led consortium a contract worth 88 million Euros for the electrification of three railway lines.

  • Condition-based maintenance could save millions

    10 Jun 2004

    EA Technology claims large industrial and public sector electricity users could save money by adopting the latest best practice for maintaining their oil-filled 11kV switchgear.

  • HKO increases production capacity

    10 Jun 2004

    Hong Kong Oxygen has signed a contract to build an air separation unit and liquefier to supply Zhujiang Iron & Steel Corporation's steel making operations.

  • Drives order nets ABB $22 million

    1 Jun 2004

    GE Oil and Gas has awarded ABB $22 million to provide electrical drive systems for an onshore gas processing plant that will support Norway's Ormen Lange gas field.

Digital Edition

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