Last week’s poll: new surge for tidal energy?

Europe’s largest tidal array has been consented in the Pentand Firth off Orkney, a project that is expected to eventually generate up to 86MW of power. What will it take for tidal energy to make an appreciable contribution to the UK’s energy needs?

The overwhelming majority of respondents to last week’s poll believe much more government investment in tidal technologies is required, with 76 per cent agreeing with this viewpoint.

Only three per cent wrote off tidal entirely, believing it too small to make an appreciable contribution to the UK’s energy mix, whilst nine per cent took the view that the answer lies in large-scale projects to build tidal barrages at several estuary sites.

A wider view was taken by seven per cent who believe a concerted effort should be made to develop renewables rather than shale gas, and five per cent believe tidal will make a credible contribution to the UK’s energy needs through the development of grid-connected energy storage at sites with a high tidal flow, such as Pentland and the Irish Sea.

What will it take for tidal energy to make an appreciable contribution to the UK's energy needs?

As The Engineer reported on September 16, MeyGen will install the tidal array in stages, beginning with a 9MW demonstration project of up to six turbines. Construction starts in early 2014 with turbines set for commissioning in 2015.

This followed an announcement by DECC on February 27, 2013 that Meygen was one of two companies to take a share of £20m under the government’s Marine Energy Array Demonstrator scheme to support the development and testing of pre-commercial marine devices.

Speaking at the time, Greg Barker, energy and climate change minister said, ‘The UK, with its amazing natural resource and outstanding technical know-how is already leading the way on marine power for the rest of the world to follow, and I want to ensure we stay top of this table.’

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