Saturday, 22 November 2014

The Engineer
March 2004 Online

  • BAE Systems has sights on $250 million contract

    31 Mar 2004

    BAE Systems has been awarded a contract worth up to $250 million by the US Army's Communication and Electronics Command to supply thermal weapon sights for its soldiers.

  • BASF sells polystyrene business

    31 Mar 2004

    BASF has sold its specialty polystyrene business, which includes compounds of flame retardant and antistatic polystyrene specialty products, to Spartech Polycom for an undisclosed price.

  • Unlocking the inventory

    31 Mar 2004

    Engineers are developing a system that will enable people to search industry databases by sketching a part from memory or selecting a part that has a similar shape.

  • Mercury-absorbing pollution solution

    31 Mar 2004

  • Keeping MEMS moving

    30 Mar 2004

  • Chemists describe new 'nanotube' transistor

    30 Mar 2004

    Researchers exploring ways to build ultrasmall electronic devices out of atom-thick carbon cylinders have incorporated one of these "carbon nanotubes" into a new kind of field effect transistor.

  • GE Energy awarded wind turbine contracts

    30 Mar 2004

  • Bring on the bio

    30 Mar 2004

    A new study from Technical Insights says that the future of hydrogen fuel cell technology is likely to be weakened by issues regarding availability expenses involved in storage.

  • Boosting chemical fermentation

    30 Mar 2004

    A device invented at Ohio State University is said to have boosted the production of a chemical that performs tasks as diverse as scenting perfume and flavouring Swiss cheese.

  • Siliconix turns the power on

    30 Mar 2004

  • MicroUnity files against Dell and Intel

    29 Mar 2004

    MicroUnity Systems Engineering has filed a lawsuit against Dell, Inc and Intel Corp alleging that certain Dell computer systems and Intel microprocessors infringe seven MicroUnity patents.

  • Household humidifier creates nano materials

    29 Mar 2004

    Chemists are using household humidifiers to make complex nanocomposite materials that could prove useful as catalysts in the process industry.

  • Nellcor to appeal patent verdict

    29 Mar 2004

  • Alstom awarded pollution control contract

    29 Mar 2004

  • Healing hydrogel

    29 Mar 2004

    Researchers in the US have created a new class of artificial proteins that can assemble themselves into a gel and encourage the growth of selected cell types.

  • Buckyball shown to cause brain damage

    29 Mar 2004

    Researchers have found that a type of buckyball, a carbon nanoparticle that shows promise in a range of applications, can cause significant brain damage in fish.

  • ADC to acquire KRONE Group

    26 Mar 2004

    ADC announced yesterday that it is to acquire the KRONE Group, a global supplier of copper and fibre-based cabling products from GenTek Inc for $350 million.

  • Brighter future for carbon nanotubes

    26 Mar 2004

    A scientist at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory has caused an individual carbon nanotube to emit light for the first time.

  • Radar scan converter tucks into half-height PCI

    25 Mar 2004

    Primagraphics' Advantage Xi is a new generation of commercial-off-the-shelf radar scan converter cards in a half-size PCI form factor.

  • Polymer injection forming

    25 Mar 2004

  • Titania nanotube hydrogen sensors clean themselves

    25 Mar 2004

  • Durable diamonds in a dash

    25 Mar 2004

    Scientists in the US have produced gem-sized diamonds that are harder than any other crystals and at a rate of up to 100 times faster than other methods used.

  • UK manufacturing hits new high

    26 Mar 2004

  • Space saving diodes

    26 Mar 2004

    Vishay Intertechnology has announced the release of a new Zener diode series, which has been designed specifically for space-sensitive voltage-regulation applications.

  • Supercritical CO2 finds new use in medical implants

    26 Mar 2004

    Carbon dioxide, an environmentally friendly solvent for dyeing and dry cleaning, may become a valuable new tool for making medical implants, according to a study at Ohio State University.

  • Alstom chosen for cruise ship contract

    16 Mar 2004

    Alstom announced today that it has been chosen to build two 1,275 cabin cruise-ships, with an option for a third sister-ship, for Mediterranean Shipping Company.

  • Panel support

    17 Mar 2004

    Parvus Corporation has released the 104FX Super VGA video card, a PC/104 form-factor video controller designed to provide embedded computers with support for analogue CRT and flat-panel LCD-TFT monitors.

  • Sensor technologies enhance factory operations

    17 Mar 2004

    According to Technical Insights, a new simulation engine that remotely controls factory processes in real time using data from sensors is likely to be the next big innovation in assembly line management.

  • Glaxo and Imperial enter medical imaging partnership

    17 Mar 2004

    GlaxoSmithKline and Imperial College London have signed agreement to establish major research partnerships in medical imaging at Hammersmith Hospital in London.

  • Consortium proposes cleaner steel

    17 Mar 2004

    European steelmakers, industrial organisations, research institutes and universities have proposed a 40 million Euro integrated project to develop technologies that will substantially reduce CO2 emissions in steelmaking.

  • Thales takes off with EADS

    17 Mar 2004

    Thales has signed new contracts worth almost 100 million Euros with EADS to supply over 500 Threat Warning Equipment self-protection systems for Eurocopter Tiger and NH90 helicopters.

  • Restructuring the rail

    17 Mar 2004

  • Point to point

    17 Mar 2004

    Texas Instruments' new TLK3118 serializer/deserializer (SERDES) is a redundant XAUI serial transceiver that is compliant with the IEEE 802.3ae specification for 10 Gbit/sec Ethernet.

  • ABB sails into $110 million contract

    17 Mar 2004

  • Wave buoys help flood forecasters

    18 Mar 2004

    Wave-measuring buoys which could help warn of an impending flood have been strategically placed around the UK coastline as part of a three-year monitoring project.

  • Unfair competition

    19 Mar 2004

    The US Trade Representative is requesting formal consultations with China under the World Trade Organization's dispute settlement procedures due to what the US says is China's 'discriminatory' VAT on semiconductors.

  • Raisio Chemicals sold for 475 million Euros

    19 Mar 2004

    Raisio Group today signed a deal to sell its subsidiary, Raisio Chemicals, to Swiss-based Ciba Specialty Chemicals for 475 million Euros.

  • 3M unveils RFID progress

    19 Mar 2004

    A 3M scientist has unveiled the company's progress in creating organic semiconductor chips that could pave the way for mass production of low-cost RFID tags.

  • General Dynamics acquires Spectrum Astro

    19 Mar 2004

  • 'Nano-lightning' could cool future computers

    24 Mar 2004

  • Chinese buy a power supply

    24 Mar 2004

  • BHP Billiton approves $1.4 billion nickel project

    24 Mar 2004

    Melbourne-based BHP Billiton has announced approval for the development of the Ravensthorpe Project and related expansion of the Yabulu Nickel Refinery in Australia.

  • Bayer acquires Gustafson's NAFTA interests

    24 Mar 2004

    Bayer CropScience yesterday signed an agreement to purchase Crompton Corporation's share of the Gustafson seed treatment business in the US, Canada and Mexico for $124 million.

  • Phones go Wi-Fi

    24 Mar 2004

  • Camera link cable length enhancer

    24 Mar 2004

  • Testing time for photodiodes

    24 Mar 2004

  • Putting I/O on PC/104

    24 Mar 2004

  • Digital up-converter

    24 Mar 2004

    Analog Devices has released details of its new AD6633, a digital up-converter that reduces output power requirements for 3G wireless base station power amplifiers.

  • Building molecular motors

    24 Mar 2004

    Researchers in Israel and the US have made a molecule rotate on an axis in a controlled manner, a development that marks a step toward the creation of practical molecular motors.

  • Laser sheds light on emissions

    24 Mar 2004

    Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories' Combustion Research Facility have demonstrated the ability to measure 'real world' particulate emissions from a vehicle under actual driving conditions.

  • Spin-coated chips

    24 Mar 2004

    IBM researchers have developed a process to make thin films of semiconducting materials that allows electrical charges to move through them about 10 times more easily than other similar approaches.

  • AMEC - Fluor awarded $1.1 billion

    25 Mar 2004

    An AMEC - Fluor joint venture has won two contracts worth up to $1.1 billion to restore public works and water infrastructure in Iraq.

  • New trains for Charlotte

    25 Mar 2004

  • Microsoft fined millions

    25 Mar 2004

  • Rhodia fined $18 million for polluting Montana

    2 Mar 2004

    A US court has ordered Rhodia to pay $18 million in criminal fines and restitution for environmental damages in Montana.

  • Streaming specification

    8 Mar 2004

    The Internet Streaming Media Alliance has released details of Version 1 of its Encryption and Authentication Specification, a content protection specification that provides a framework for secure content delivery over IP networks.

  • Channel-to-channel isolation

    8 Mar 2004

    National Instruments has added three channel-to-channel isolated digital I/O and timing boards to its PC hardware repertoire.

  • Kodak snaps up German printers

    8 Mar 2004

    Eastman Kodak is to acquire two lines of business from Heidelberger Druckmaschinen, the world's largest maker of offset printing machines.

  • Polymer patches wounded joints

    9 Mar 2004

    Biomedical engineers in the US have developed a technique that uses a natural polymer to fill in and protect cartilage wounds within joints.

  • Xilinx acquires Triscend

    9 Mar 2004

    Xilinx has signed an agreement to acquire Triscend, a developer of customisable embedded microcontrollers and Configurable System-on-Chip (CSoC) devices.

  • UK tax change may trigger IT shortage

    9 Mar 2004

    The UK Chancellor of the Exchequer is threatening to issue a major tax blow to freelance contractors in next week's Budget that will restrict the mobility of labour and could lead to a serious shortage of skilled IT experts says Barry Roback.

  • Singularly flexible

    9 Mar 2004

    Vishay is adding new devices with a low absolute TCR of ±10 ppm over the full -55 degrees C to +125 degrees C temperature range to its CTN series of nichrome resistor chips.

  • Communication covered

    9 Mar 2004

    Parvus Corporation recently released its MultiComm 8-port serial controller module, which delivers RS-232/422/485, Ethernet, and CAN protocol functionality for embedded PC/104 computer systems.

  • £9.6 million manufacturing boost for Northern Ireland

    9 Mar 2004

    American electronics company IceMOS Technology Corporation announced today that it is to invest £9.6 million in setting up a new manufacturing operation in Belfast.

  • Design contract awarded for $5 billion GTL project

    10 Mar 2004

    Shell yesterday awarded a Front End Engineering and Design contract to Japan's JGC Inc for the onshore design of a $5 billion Gas to Liquids (GTL) project in Qatar.

  • Contract options net Bombardier $780 million

    10 Mar 2004

    Bombardier Aerospace announced recently that Delta Connection has placed a $780 million order for 32 50-seat Bombardier CRJ200 regional jets. Deliveries are scheduled for 2005.

  • Smiths detects $15 million acquisition

    10 Mar 2004

    Smiths Detection, a division of Smiths Group plc, has today extended the range of its detection technologies through the $15 million acquisition of Cyrano Sciences, Inc.

  • Carbon dioxide for sale

    10 Mar 2004

    Dave Wilson describes the glamour and easy charm of a future where trading in carbon emissions has become the norm.

  • Alstom to build Saudi Arabian steam power plant

    10 Mar 2004

  • Wireless factory keeps on humming

    10 Mar 2004

  • Eliminating friendly fire

    11 Mar 2004

  • Shocking treatment for cells

    11 Mar 2004

    The treatment of conditions such as cancer and leukaemia may be improved thanks to technology developed in the US that uses electric fields to alter the 'guts' of a cell.

  • Sales restored

    11 Mar 2004

  • Alstom wins Melbourne rail contract

    11 Mar 2004

  • Can we afford to keep the lights on?

    11 Mar 2004

    In a report published yesterday, The Royal Academy of Engineering revealed that electricity from offshore wind farms, currently the most viable renewable source, will cost at least twice as much as that from conventional sources.

  • Anti-rolling gyros go for a cruise

    11 Mar 2004

    The Ferretti Group, the Italian yacht manufacturer, is to install Mitsubishi Heavy Industries anti-rolling gyro stabilisation systems onto its vessels to suppress one of the main causes of seasickness - rolling motion.

  • Improving the cleanliness of hydraulics

    11 Mar 2004

    Pall Corporation has introduced a new series of filters, dubbed the Ultipleat SRT, that combine a compact element design with new filtration media that improves fluid cleanliness to increase the reliability and longevity of hydraulic systems.

  • Retaining talent

    11 Mar 2004

    A new £23 million scheme to improve the career prospects of Britain's researchers was launched today at the opening event of National Science Week.

  • S-Polka to avert calamities in clouds

    11 Mar 2004

    Scientists in the USA are testing S-Polka, a system designed to pinpoint water droplets in clouds that cause a build-up of hazardous ice on aircraft in flight.

  • Goodrich joins 7E7 team

    12 Mar 2004

    Goodrich Corporation has been selected by Boeing to provide the Fuel Quantity Indicating System and Fuel Management Software for the new Boeing 7E7 Dreamliner.

  • New method produces uniform self-assembly

    12 Mar 2004

  • Single-crystal plastic transistors reveal hidden behaviour

    12 Mar 2004

    Scientists in the US are studying charge transport within organic semiconductors in order to maximise the performance of thin-film transistors for flexible displays.

  • Emissions trading could leave UK in the dark

    12 Mar 2004

    The CBI warned this week that the risk to UK business from new government environmental targets could become excessive if other European Union economies fail to deliver on their targets.

  • Gravity exposes shielded nukes

    12 Mar 2004

    Nuclear Solutions, Inc is developing an advanced detection device to detect and localise the presence of portable nuclear weapons and shielded nuclear materials.

  • UGS PLM Solutions sold for $2.05 billion

    15 Mar 2004

    EDS announced yesterday that it has reached an agreement to sell its UGS PLM Solutions unit for $2.05 billion to a group of three private equity firms.

  • Smiths Group acquires DGT for £60 million

    15 Mar 2004

    The UK's Smiths Group is extending its aerospace business activities in specialist aircraft engine component fabrication with the £60 million acquisition of Connecticut-based Dynamic Gunver Technologies.

  • Water finds a channel in electronic devices

    15 Mar 2004

    Scientists at Bell Labs have discovered a new method to control the behaviour of liquid droplets by applying electrical charges to specially engineered silicon surfaces.

  • Tapping a lucrative seam

    15 Mar 2004

    More than 3,500 jobs will be safeguarded and a further 100 created as £36.4 million is released to the coal industry under the UK Government's Coal Investment Aid scheme.

  • ABB awarded $22 million power equipment contract

    15 Mar 2004

    ABB has been awarded $22 million by a GE-led consortium to deliver power station equipment for the Yixing pumped storage power station in eastern China.

  • Zoran and Oak file for damages

    16 Mar 2004

    Zoran Corporation and its subsidiary Oak Technology are seeking damages from Taiwan's MediaTek Inc and Mintek Digital for alleged infringement of three US patents.

  • GE agrees to $900 million InVision acquisition

    16 Mar 2004

  • BOC lands TGCM contract

    16 Mar 2004

  • New chip guides molecular analysis

    16 Mar 2004

    A student at Johns Hopkins University, Maryland, has constructed a new type of microchip that can move and isolate DNA and protein molecules.

  • Advanced object detection

    1 Mar 2004

  • Tunable transceiver

    1 Mar 2004

  • Chatting to the coalition

    1 Mar 2004

  • For funding, click here

    1 Mar 2004

    A new website is up and running that provides help and advice to UK organisations interested in taking advantage of European Union Framework Programme Six (FP6) funding for research and development projects.

  • Microwave imaging

    2 Mar 2004

    Microwaves could provide a safe new way of finding hidden weapons and buried mines, thanks to UK research.

  • Applied Micro Circuits to acquire 3ware

    3 Mar 2004

    Applied Micro Circuits Corporation has signed a definitive agreement to acquire 3ware, a provider of Serial ATA (SATA) storage solutions.

  • Strongest growth for 7 years

    3 Mar 2004

    Britain's manufacturers experienced their strongest growth in seven years in the first quarter of this year according to one of the UK's leading business trends surveys.

  • Nobody said it was easy

    3 Mar 2004

    When Andy graduated from high school, he was delighted to find that one of the UK's top engineering Universities had offered him a four-year degree course. But things haven't worked out so well.

  • Imaging technique identifies breast cancer

    3 Mar 2004

  • Thickness measurement and control

    3 Mar 2004

  • Broadband over power lines

    4 Mar 2004

    US-based Cinergy Broadband and the Current Communications Group are to offer broadband over power line services in the greater Cincinnati, OH area.

  • Siemens grabs Moeller's trunk

    4 Mar 2004

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Poll

With police this week warning a House of Lords committee that off-the-shelf “drones” are being used to harass people, there are growing calls for tighter regulations to prevent criminal use of the technology. Are these concerns justified? With which of the following statements do you most strongly agree?