Thursday, 02 October 2014
masthead+quote+image
Advanced search

Stiff competition for nanotechnology

Microtubules, essential structural elements in living cells, grow stiffer as they grow longer, an unexpected property that could lead to advances in nanomaterials development.

A team of biophysicists from The University of Texas at Austin, the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, and Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, researched their potential.

“We found that the microtubules grow stiffer as they grow longer, a very unusual and surprising result,” said Ernst-Ludwig Florin, assistant professor with the Center for Nonlinear Dynamics at The University of Texas at Austin. “This will have a big impact on our understanding of how microtubules function in the cell and on advancing materials research.

“To my knowledge, no manmade material has this property to become stiffer as it elongates,” said Florin. “This research could lead to the design of novel materials based on this biological structure.”

Microtubules, which are about 25 nanometres in diameter, play an essential role in many cellular processes, acting as girders to support the cell. They also form tracks along which organelles, structures in cells that perform specialised functions, can move. They are also essential components of flagella and cilia, the extensions of some cells that give them movement.

Florin and his colleagues measured the stiffness and length of cellular microtubules using a single-particle tracking technique. They attached yellow-green fluorescent beads to the tips of microtubules of various lengths and measured the position of the bead by analysing frame-by-frame videos of the beads moving in solution.

The changes in the beads’ position were used to calculate the stiffness of the filaments they were attached to, through a method recently developed by the theoretical physicists on the research team.

To the surprise of the scientists, they found that the longer the filament, the more rigid it became.

Florin and his colleagues attribute the microtubules’ unique properties to their molecular architecture. The nanometre-sized filaments are hollow tubes made of tubulin proteins that bind to each other in ways that give them the ability to be both flexible and stiff.

The new finding about the microtubules’ properties could provide insights into using the filaments as models for the development of nanomaterials.


Have your say

Mandatory
Mandatory
Mandatory
Mandatory

My saved stories (Empty)

You have no saved stories

Save this article