Sunday, 23 November 2014

The Engineer
October 2004 Online

  • Plug-ins for quick comparison

    29 Oct 2004

  • China orders metro cars

    29 Oct 2004

    Changchun Bombardier Railway Vehicles has today received a $20 million order from the Guangzhou Metro Corporation for the supply of 48 MOVIA metro cars.

  • Contact lenses deliver medication

    29 Oct 2004

    Scientists in Singapore have recently invented a simple method of making polymeric lens materials that can be loaded with eye medication for ophthalmic drug delivery applications.

  • Welding done in a flash

    29 Oct 2004

    Chemists have found that an ordinary camera flash causes the instantaneous welding together of nanofibres made of polyaniline, a synthetic polymer that can be made in conducting or insulating form.

  • Inxight files suit against Verity

    29 Oct 2004

  • PAS acquires fourth Q300

    29 Oct 2004

    Bombardier Aerospace has signed a $16.0 million contract with Cairo-based Petroleum Air Services (PAS) for the sale of one additional Bombardier Q300 turboprop 50-seat regional airliner.

  • Low cost, low power

    28 Oct 2004

    Parvus Corporation will soon release a PCI-104 form factor Single Board Computer, the SpacePC 8500, designed with a low voltage 400MHz Intel Celeron Processor and Intel 815E chipset.

  • New CompactFlash serial cards

    28 Oct 2004

    Sealevel Systems, a supplier of serial and digital I/O solutions, has recently announced four new CompactFlash serial I/O adapters aimed at mobile computing applications.

  • Turkish Airlines places $1.5 billion Airbus order

    28 Oct 2004

  • Superconducting clues uncovered

    28 Oct 2004

    Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have uncovered another possible clue to the causes of high-temperature superconductivity.

  • Crimes caught on cassette

    28 Oct 2004

    The US National Institute of Standards and Technology has developed a real-time magnetic imaging system that enables criminal investigators to "see" signs of tampering in audiotapes.

  • Low power light switch

    27 Oct 2004

    Cornell University researchers have demonstrated for the first time a device that allows one low-powered beam of light to switch another on and off on silicon.

  • Globally positioned

    27 Oct 2004

    The Chinese have joined the Galileo GPS project. The US is a tad worried. And who can blame them? Dave Wilson spills the beans.

  • Transmitting through the fog

    27 Oct 2004

    Engineers at Penn State University believe multi-rate, ultra-short laser pulses offer a new approach to help optical wireless signals penetrate fog and other adverse weather conditions.

  • Integris Metals sold for $410 million

    27 Oct 2004

    Alcoa and BHP Billiton have today agreed to sell 100% of their respective equity interests in Integris Metals to Ryerson Tull for $410 million in cash.

  • Laser shines light on artificial limbs

    27 Oct 2004

    Artificial limbs might one day be controlled directly by the brain following the discovery of a method to stimulate and control nerve cells via laser light.

  • Alstom awarded 150 million Euros

    27 Oct 2004

    The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority has today awarded Alstom an order worth around 150 million Euros for the supply of 120 heavy rail subway cars.

  • Three-axis stepper drives

    27 Oct 2004

  • Visteon moves to Slovakia

    18 Oct 2004

    Visteon Corporation is to invest $49 million building a new manufacturing facility in Nitra, Slovakia to support its business relationships with automakers Kia and PSA Peugeot Citroën.

  • Green sea energy

    19 Oct 2004

    Atlantis Energy has signed an agreement with Country Energy to develop a pilot site in the Clarence Valley on the far north coast of New South Wales to test out a new wave energy machine.

  • Integrated Aerospace bought for £61 million

    19 Oct 2004

    Smiths Group announced today that it is acquiring Integrated Aerospace, a privately owned, California-based supplier of specialist landing gear systems, for £61 million.

  • Network security

    19 Oct 2004

  • Record breaking nanotube

    19 Oct 2004

    Scientists in the US have synthesised the world's longest electrically conducting nanotubes, a development that could lead to improved power transmission lines and extremely strong, lightweight materials.

  • ABB wins $100 million oil platform order

    19 Oct 2004

  • 15 million gates

    19 Oct 2004

    Honeywell has introduced a 150 nanometre, 15 million gate integrated circuit technology that increases speed and bandwidth capabilities for processing and transmitting data in aerospace systems.

  • With Bill, it's personal

    20 Oct 2004

    If you don't have Broadband, you might have to rely on the Post Office. And that, as Dr. Bill found out, can be problematic. Dave Wilson explains.

  • VFDs for all seasons

    19 Oct 2004

  • Under my skin

    20 Oct 2004

    A US researcher has developed a microscopic colour-changing sensor that can be placed just under the skin to allow a user to visibly monitor glucose levels.

  • Yellow river

    20 Oct 2004

    GE Energy has received a contract of nearly $35 million to supply four turbine-generator sets for the new Xi Xia Yuan hydroelectric facility on the Yellow River in Henan Province, China.

  • Testing times for pathogens

    20 Oct 2004

    Affymetrix is to develop a biodefence microarray test that can detect hundreds of bacterial and viral biological threats, such as anthrax and plague, in as little as four hours.

  • Rolls-Royce to power Spanish plants

    20 Oct 2004

    Moyresa of Spain, a major operator in the oilseed crushing and refining industry, has selected nine Rolls-Royce K-gas engines to power three major electricity cogeneration projects.

  • Microsphere shot

    21 Oct 2004

    A new 'stable liquid' technology, developed by Cambridge Biostability will enable vaccines to be stored for long periods in a range of environmental conditions.

  • When good metals go bad

    21 Oct 2004

    Air travel may become safer as a result of research at USC into corrosion-induced failure in high-performance metals used in aerospace and other demanding applications.

  • Point-and-pay

    21 Oct 2004

  • Banning PFOS

    21 Oct 2004

  • Robot investment on the up

    21 Oct 2004

    The 2004 World Robotics survey, produced by The United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE), shows that orders for robots were up by 18% in the first half of 2004.

  • Magnetic sensors tackle viruses

    21 Oct 2004

  • Boeing confirms Primaris order

    21 Oct 2004

    Boeing today confirmed that Primaris Airlines has chosen the Boeing 7E7-8 Dreamliner and the 737-800 for the carrier's future fleet development.

  • Money in the wind

    21 Oct 2004

    Siemens Power Generation is to buy the Danish wind turbine manufacturer Bonus Energy, a company that currently ranks fifth among the world's biggest turbine manufacturers.

  • Hollywood goes mobile

    21 Oct 2004

  • Express image acquisition

    21 Oct 2004

    National Instruments announced yesterday that its first PCI Express-based image acquisition board for high-throughput vision applications will be ready for delivery in January 2005.

  • Taxiing toward $183 billion in aircraft acquisitions

    22 Oct 2004

    Boeing this week released its Current Market Outlook for China, projecting that by 2023 the country's air carriers will require nearly 2,300 new airplanes.

  • New fibre optic sensors increase range

    22 Oct 2004

    Researchers in the US are on their way to solving a problem that is limiting the range and number of sensors used to safeguard civil and industrial infrastructure.

  • Consolidated steel

    25 Oct 2004

  • Arch sells materials business for $160 million

    25 Oct 2004

    Arch Chemicals has signed an agreement to sell the majority of the operations of its microelectronic materials business to Fuji Photo Film for approximately $160 million.

  • Alcoa to clean up in Spain

    25 Oct 2004

  • 7E7 contract nets Parker over $1 billion

    25 Oct 2004

    Parker Hannifin has recently been awarded a contract for the hydraulic subsystem for the new Boeing 7E7 Dreamliner, plus individual components on the aircraft and GE candidate engine.

  • High-power blue LEDs

    25 Oct 2004

    SDK has developed a 12 mW blue light-emitting diode LED with a flip chip structure that will be used to backlight liquid crystal displays and be used in the photoflash units of mobile phones.

  • 13,300-lumen LED array

    26 Oct 2004

    Lamina Ceramics claims to have developed the brightest LED light array ever built - it says its RGB (red-green-blue) LED array is about 10 times brighter than any previously demonstrated.

  • Hydrogen Aggressor

    26 Oct 2004

  • Transforming 3D imaging

    26 Oct 2004

    A start-up company has emerged from Johns Hopkins University with a product that processes millions of data points in real time and turns them into 3-D graphics.

  • Single-chip power over Ethernet

    26 Oct 2004

  • Toward quantum communications

    26 Oct 2004

    A team of physicists at the Georgia Institute of Technology has successfully transferred quantum information from two different groups of atoms onto a single photon.

  • Monkey think, monkey do

    27 Oct 2004

    Researchers have demonstrated that a monkey can feed itself with a robotic arm using signals from its brain, an advance that could enhance prosthetics for people with spinal cord injuries.

  • HTS alliance

    8 Oct 2004

    American Superconductor and Northrop Grumman have formed a business alliance to sell, market and develop products for the US military based on high temperature superconductor (HTS) wire.

  • Buying turboprops

    11 Oct 2004

    Bombardier Aerospace announced yesterday that Air New Zealand has signed a $269.5 million contract to acquire 17 Bombardier Q300 50-seat turboprop aircraft.

  • Alstom breaks billion Euro barrier

    11 Oct 2004

  • No need for needles

    11 Oct 2004

  • Roping in Transcore

    11 Oct 2004

  • Mapping pollution

    11 Oct 2004

    European researchers have successfully processed data from Envisat to generate the sharpest maps yet made of vertical columns of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide.

  • Wind in China

    11 Oct 2004

  • Optimised cooling

    12 Oct 2004

    Kistler has developed a new system to optimise the residual cooling time of an injection moulding process in order to lower the cycle time.

  • Shaping and welding

    12 Oct 2004

  • Display start up

    12 Oct 2004

    Researchers from Ghent University and IMEC have formed a new company to develop liquid-crystal-on-silicon micro-displays.

  • Testing times for software

    13 Oct 2004

    A software controlled cruise control system needs to undergo more than 800,000 unique test scenarios before software errors can be completely removed. And that's economically impossible using standard software development techniques.

  • Buying magnets

    12 Oct 2004

    Palo Alto, CA-based Varian is to acquire the Oxford firm of Magnex Scientific Limited for $32 million in cash and in the process will 'rationalise' its field support administration in the UK.

  • Qualcomm buys Trigenix

    13 Oct 2004

  • Gel seals incisions

    13 Oct 2004

    Boston University researchers have produced an elastic, transparent gel that sets so fast and adheres so surely to the eye's surface that it could soon become the best choice for sealing corneal incisions.

  • Band aid

    13 Oct 2004

  • Parker acquires Sporlan Valve

    13 Oct 2004

    Parker Hannifin has acquired the Washington, Missouri-based Sporlan Valve Company for an undisclosed amount.

  • Deere in Brazil

    13 Oct 2004

    Deere and Company is to invest $80 million to construct a new tractor facility in Montenegro, Rio Grande do Sul in Brasil.

  • Mobile phone neuroma

    14 Oct 2004

    A study produced by researchers at the Institute of Environmental Medicine at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows that 10 or more years of mobile phone use almost doubles the risk of contracting a tumour on the auditory nerve.

  • Shielded power

    14 Oct 2004

  • Ultrasound diagnosis for whiplash

    14 Oct 2004

  • Cargo scanner

    14 Oct 2004

    Australian researchers at CSIRO Minerals have developed a scanner that can accurately and rapidly detect illicit drugs and explosives concealed inside air freight containers.

  • Flueless gas action

    14 Oct 2004

    The UK Government has announced a series of proposals to improve indoor air quality by reducing pollution from flueless gas appliances such as gas cookers, water heaters and flueless gas fires.

  • Nuclear slammer

    14 Oct 2004

    One of the first ever global reports into industrial cyber security reveals a tenfold increase in successful cyber attacks on process and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems since 2000.

  • Ground monitoring

    15 Oct 2004

    A team of US scientists are developing a wireless sensor designed to warn against geotechnical hazards such as earthquakes, landslides, and floods.

  • Alzheimer's disease

    15 Oct 2004

    A $60 million US study, sponsored by top names in the pharmaceuticals business, will examine ways of measuring the progression of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

  • Nuclear energy to go

    15 Oct 2004

    Three US Laboratories are aiming to develop a small, sealed, transportable, autonomous nuclear reactor in a tamper-resistant container.

  • China orders 20 high-speed trains

    18 Oct 2004

    Bombardier and two joint venture partners have recently received a $424 million order from the Ministry of Railways of China to produce and deliver 20 eight-car high-speed trains.

  • ABB wins $60 million Three Gorges order

    18 Oct 2004

    ABB has today been awarded contracts worth $60 million to supply a 500kV gas insulated switchgear and 12 sets of power transformers to China's Three Gorges dam project.

  • New partners for engine programme

    18 Oct 2004

    Rolls-Royce announced today that Goodrich Corporation and Hamilton Sundstrand have been selected as partners on the Trent 1000 engine being developed for the Boeing 7E7 Dreamliner.

  • Grabbing Spike

    1 Oct 2004

  • DuPont and Cheil form SD Flex

    1 Oct 2004

    DuPont and Cheil Industries have signed a 50/50 joint venture agreement to establish SD Flex, a company that will manufacture DuPont Pyralux adhesiveless, flexible copper clad laminate.

  • Offshore manufacturing: ending apathy is the only solution

    1 Oct 2004

    Is offshore outsourcing an inevitable fate for UK manufacturing? Chris Astall of Cincom Systems argues that looking closer to home at lean operations can lead to equal savings.

  • Reducing the impact of collisions

    1 Oct 2004

  • Industry's first multi-mode wireless device server

    4 Oct 2004

    DeviceMaster AIR from Comtrol enables users to connect serial or Ethernet devices to an Ethernet network either "wirelessly" using the 802.11b industry standard or using standard wire.

  • Under the sea

    4 Oct 2004

    Sponsored by major players in the oil and gas field, Qinetiq and Input/Output are to develop and deploy the world's first fibre optic seabed seismic acquisition system.

  • Schneider buys Dinel

    4 Oct 2004

    Schneider Electric announced today that it has acquired Dinel, a French company that designs, develops and markets a wide array of optoelectronic products.

  • Click to touch

    4 Oct 2004

  • Boeing predicts $552 billion market

    5 Oct 2004

    According to Boeing, Ireland will require more than 300 new aeroplanes over the next 20 years, with the rest of Europe's airlines needing 6,700 aircraft to meet travellers' demands.

  • Climate change

    5 Oct 2004

    The University of Adelaide is working on the development of a radar imaging system that could assist researchers in better understanding climate change.

  • Reducing NOx

    5 Oct 2004

    Glennan Microsystems proposes to develop and demonstrate an active fuel and emission control system that will reduce NOx emissions from gas turbine engines by 70%.

  • It's not Origami

    6 Oct 2004

    Dave Wilson discusses how the art of paper folding could potentially reveal how good we are as managers. Or does he?

  • Petrobras places $80 million genset order

    6 Oct 2004

    Rolls-Royce announced yesterday that it has been awarded $80 million to supply seven power generation packages for Brazilian offshore projects currently being undertaken by Petrobras.

  • Buying test and measurement

    6 Oct 2004

    On the heels of its recent North American restructuring, EADS North America has acquired test and measurement specialist Racal Instruments in a deal worth $105 million.

  • Calculation results in hydrogen rethink

    6 Oct 2004

    Researchers have calculated that any move to replace Britain's oil burning vehicles with hydrogen powered equivalents would require the erection of 100,000 wind turbines or 100 nuclear power plants.

  • UK regulators suspend Fluvirin production

    6 Oct 2004

    The UK's Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency has temporarily suspended Chiron Corporation's license to manufacture Fluvirin influenza virus vaccine at its Liverpool facility.

  • Better junctions for silicon-based semiconductors

    6 Oct 2004

  • Cord in China

    7 Oct 2004

    Bridgestone Corporation has earmarked $94.3 million to build a plant in Shenyang, China to produce steel cord for radial tyres.

  • National statistics

    7 Oct 2004

    According to data recently released by the Office for National Statistics, manufacturing output in the UK decreased by 0.4% in the three months to August compared with the three months to May.

  • Bombardier Aerospace axes 2000 jobs

    7 Oct 2004

    Bombardier Aerospace announced today that it is to shed approximately 2,000 jobs at its Montréal and Belfast sites over a nine-month period starting this November.

  • Research shines light on explosives detection

    7 Oct 2004

    A team of University of Florida researchers has invented a way to rapidly detect traces of TNT or other hidden explosives by shining a light on any potentially contaminated object.

  • Radio astronomers remove the blindfold

    7 Oct 2004

  • Listeriosis licked by new biosensor

    8 Oct 2004

    The pathogen responsible for a pre-cooked chicken recall in the USA last summer will become easier to detect in ready-to-eat meats, thanks to a new biosensor developed at Purdue University.

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Poll

With police this week warning a House of Lords committee that off-the-shelf “drones” are being used to harass people, there are growing calls for tighter regulations to prevent criminal use of the technology. Are these concerns justified? With which of the following statements do you most strongly agree?