Wednesday, 23 April 2014
masthead+quote+image
Advanced search

Plessey acquires Cambridge University spin-out CamGaN

Plessey has acquired CamGaN, a Cambridge University spin-out formed to commercialise novel technologies for the growth of gallium nitride (GaN) high-brightness (HB) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on large-area silicon substrates.

The acquisition will enable Plessey to exploit synergies with its 6in (15cm) processing facility in Plymouth, UK, to produce HB LEDs based on CamGaN’s proprietary 6in GaN-on-silicon technology.

The company believes this acquisition positions it among the first commercial players to successfully manufacture HB LEDs on 6in silicon substrates.

The newly acquired Plessey HB LED solution enables the growth of thin HB LED structures on standard, readily available, silicon substrates.

Current technologies use silicon carbide (SiC) or sapphire substrates, which are expensive and difficult to scale up.

Plessey’s GaN-on-silicon solution offers cost reductions in the order of 80 per cent compared with LEDs grown on SiC or sapphire by reducing scrap rates, minimising batch time and enabling the use of automated semiconductor processing equipment.

These cost reductions will be achieved while enabling outputs in excess of 150 lumens per watt later this year — a combination that will reportedly allow Plessey to offer the most cost-effective solutions in the HB LED industry.

Readers' comments (1)

  • This is great news indeed. A British owned company with a British manufacturing facility bringing to market a great British innovation. This is exactly what we need for the nation's future. Best wishes to all concerned for ongoing success and whatever you do never sell out to foreign competition.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

Have your say

Mandatory
Mandatory
Mandatory
Mandatory

My saved stories (Empty)

You have no saved stories

Save this article

Digital Edition

The Engineer April 2014 Online

Poll

Should every school have a 3D printer?

Previous Poll

Europe's largest tidal array in the Pentand Firth off Orkney will eventually generate up to 86MW of power. What will it take for tidal energy to make an appreciable contribution to the UK's energy needs?

Read and comment on the results here