Boeing fly into FAA scrutiny

The Federal Aviation Administration are proposing civil penalties against Boeing totalling more than $1.24 million for alleged breaches of FAA regulations committed over two years ago.

The Federal Aviation Administration are proposing civil penalties against Boeing totalling more than $1.24 million for alleged breaches of FAA regulations committed over two years ago.

A $741,000 penalty is being proposed for the airline’s alleged failure to assure that Boeing Commercial Airplanes Group suppliers, and sub-contractors, adhered to FAA quality control procedures.

The FAA have based the penalty on alleged violations detected during four routine FAA Airplane Certification System Evaluation Program audits conducted in 1997 and 1998.

The audits allege that suppliers were not following required quality control practises and that such failure could have resulted in Boeing using non conforming materials to build airplanes.

The second proposed penalty, totalling $500,000, is for alleged breaches of the FAA’s regulation, chapter 21.3, which defines reporting criteria for certain types of ‘failures, malfunctions and defects.’

The FAA allege that in 1997 Boeing failed to report two potential airplane safety issues in a timely manner.

Boeing are ‘aggressively pursuing several improvement initiatives to enhance supplier management processes and are co-ordinating these with the FAA’, as well as ‘providing the FAA and our customers accurate information when potential safety, reliability or performance issues become evident’.

The FAA accept that there were no direct safety implications on aircraft from the violations.