Government’s hare-brained blueprint for Broadband Britain

Power Line Telecommunications, the means by which high speed data is ‘forced’ through mains cables, is fundamentally flawed, argues the Low Power Radio Association.

It’s promoted by the government as the future of cheap internet connectivity, but Power Line Telecommunications (PLT), the means by which high speed data is ‘forced’ through mains cables, is fundamentally flawed, argues the Low Power Radio Association (LPRA).

High-speed data travelling down mains wiring requires high power data signal injection into cabling at the sub-station. This can result in a level of unwanted emissions from the mains cables as these act as transmitting aerials and emit unwanted wideband noise across the radio spectrum around the cable.

The levels of emissions pose a threat to legitimate users of the short-wave radio spectrum claims the LPRA.

Leakage from underground cables is the tip of the iceberg, continues the association, and emissions from overhead power lines in rural areas are potentially more serious. The LPRA even hints at a hush-up, claiming that a tight-lipped response from business makes it difficult to find out about PLT test findings.

Brian Back of the LPRA believes that people need to be made aware of this invisible modern pollutant and the lack of consultation surrounding PLT implementation.

‘We’re in danger of having an imposed technology’, he argues, ‘[those] who’ll be adversely affected by the adoption of PLT are simply not being consulted. There are implications for broadcasting, defence communication (since noise levels will prevent any monitoring of long distance communication), manufacturers and users of short range devices.’

‘We have been excluded from any kind of open forum,’ he continues, ‘we do not appear to be able to make our voice heard (must be all the emissions). We would welcome dialogue and an opportunity to express our views.’