Haemair/ Swansea University

THE AIM of the collaboration is to develop a respiratory aid that, by direct blood/air
mass exchange can control oxygen and carbon dioxide mass transfer rates and blood
gas concentrations. The novel technology integrates the control with the natural
ma

THE AIM of the collaboration is to develop a respiratory aid that, by direct blood/air mass exchange can control oxygen and carbon dioxide mass transfer rates and blood gas concentrations. The novel technology integrates the control with the natural mammalian respiratory control response. In this way, the device mimics a natural lung and gives stable control suitable for a conscious mobile patient. The innovative technology brought to the collaboration by Haemair is expertise in mass transfer and control. Swansea University (in association with the Morriston Hospital, Swansea) brings expertise in blood rheology. This expertise is essential in developing devices that contact blood without causing blood clotting. The Swansea centre for Complex Fluids and Complex Flows is internationally recognised, including a Royal Society Brian Mercer Award for Prof Rhodri Williams.

Haemair is confident that the mass transfer and control aspects of the respiratory aid will function successfully. This aspect of the project is one in which Haemair engineering directors have extensive R&D and commercial experience. However, they have no experience of blood coagulation. It is essential that blood that passes through a mass exchanger and is returned to the body does not contain potentially damaging blood clots, which would immediately put patient lives at risk and would negate the benefits of the device. Swansea has a unique collaboration between chemical engineers the Medical School and Morriston Hospital. This collaboration has established the university as the world’s leading centre for understanding the structure, initiation and growth of blood clots. The company/university collaboration has reduced development time by years and increased the prospects of early commercial success. As an added benefit, the collaboration has stimulated complementary research which will lead to a new spin-off with improved technology for assessing thrombogenic properties of surfaces.

For more information go to www.haemair.com