Academy boosts green studies with four appointments

Four visiting professors of engineering design for sustainable development have been appointed by the Royal Academy of Engineering. The professors, Peter Guthrie, David Bartholomew, Dr Ken Snowdon and Charles Duff, will help their universities develop a new approach in undergraduate teaching on sustainable development. The four professors all work in industry. Snowdon, Nortel Networks eco […]

Four visiting professors of engineering design for sustainable development have been appointed by the Royal Academy of Engineering.

The professors, Peter Guthrie, David Bartholomew, Dr Ken Snowdon and Charles Duff, will help their universities develop a new approach in undergraduate teaching on sustainable development.

The four professors all work in industry. Snowdon, Nortel Networks eco design and high-density interconnect manager, will advise the University of Loughborough on design, manufacture and disposal of electronic products.

Duff, of the Groundwork Foundation, started work last month with the University of Surrey on processing, recycling and dematerialisation.

Bartholomew, who will be working with Leicester’s De Montford University on energy conservation in the built environment, is head of DBA Consultants.

Guthrie, a director of engineering consultant Scott Wilson Kirkpatrick, will join the University of Cambridge to advise on sustainable construction.

A fifth appointment will be made at the University of Ulster in November. All the professors will spend around one day a week at university. The three-year visiting chairs will be funded by the Office of Science & Technology.

The professors are joining five other visiting professors who were appointed to the scheme last year.

The RA Eng has also awarded four post-doctoral research fellowships. The awards will secure funding for the winners for the next five years.

Dr Mortaza Sahibzada, a 30-year-old lecturer in chemical engineering at the University of Edinburgh, will research combined chemical production and power generation.

Dr Ambrose Taylor, a 28-year-old mechanical engineering researcher at Imperial College, London, will work on developing novel polymer silicate nanocomposites. He intends to use these to improve the toughness of composites used in construction, aerospace and vehicle manufacturing.

The fellowship awarded to Vinvente Zarzoso, an electrical and electronic engineer at University of Liverpool will allow him to continue his work on separating and detecting signals arising in multi-user communication systems.

The fourth award goes to University of Bristol civil engineering lecturer James Hall, who will be working on coastal engineering.