AES to sell database access to 35,000 engineering recruits

Engineering recruitment company AES Technical & Executive Consultants is selling a database of 35,000 people working in the sector which will enable companies to poach staff from competitors. AES said that the market for technical and sales staff has become so cut-throat that many companies are failing to find the talent they need via traditional […]

Engineering recruitment company AES Technical & Executive Consultants is selling a database of 35,000 people working in the sector which will enable companies to poach staff from competitors.

AES said that the market for technical and sales staff has become so cut-throat that many companies are failing to find the talent they need via traditional recruitment methods. As a result, it has decided to sell access to its own database of personnel built up over 11 years in the business.

The system, which is known as Gateway and costs £24,000 per year, allows employers to search 35,000 CVs held on the database for the exact skills and experience they are seeking. It will then, at the touch of a button, send a job offer by letter or e-mail to the homes of those who match the criteria.

The database is regularly up-dated by AES and also includes details of suitable candidates from internet job sites that are scanned by AES.

Despite the high cost outlay for the system, AES managing director Colin Smith said companies who usually use an outside recruitment company and recruit more than five people a year will save money.

`The people we supply are in the salary range £15,000-£40,000, that is where the skills shortage is most acute,’ he said. `For each person we place we charge 20% of the candidate’s first year salary, which amounts to £3,000-£8,000 for each placement.

`If a company is looking to recruit a lot of people, then it is more cost-effective to buy the software and the licence and to do it themselves. For £24,000 they can recruit as many people as they like.’

Companies will also save money by not having to place so many job adverts, Smith added.

According to the CBI’s quarterly industrial trends survey for July, a lack of skilled workers in engineering is holding the sector back more than at any time since October 1997.

In July, 16% of respondents said lack of skilled labour was likely to limit output.

The figure has been edging up steadily since April last year, at which time only 6% cited it as a limiting factor.

Dominique Hammond writes for Personnel Today

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