BBC doubles its intake

The BBC is doubling the number of places available on its engineering and technology graduate trainee scheme, despite the falling numbers of technology graduates in the UK.

The BBC is doubling the number of places available on its engineering and technology graduate trainee scheme, despite the falling numbers of science, engineering and technology (SET) graduates in the UK.

The expansion of the scheme is in response to the rapid growth and diversification of the media industry. As a result, the BBC – which is about to start its annual university milk-round – is looking for over 70 graduates to join the engineering and technology trainee programme next year. It will be aiming to attract a diversity of people to become BBC engineers, including more women and more graduates with arts backgrounds, as well as SET graduates.

‘Although the number of graduates with engineering and technology degrees is falling, the demand for people with those skills – particularly in the media industry – is greater than ever before,’ says Jenny Abramsky, the BBC’s director of Radio & Music.

‘But engineering isn’t just for people with science or technology qualifications; some of our best Radio and Music broadcast engineers were designers, painters, linguists, philosophers or mathematicians before they came to the BBC.’

Those who are accepted for the two to four-year development scheme will receive a mix of expert training, led by some of the media-world’s leading authorities, plus practical hands-on experience. This will include working on many of the BBC’s flagship programmes and initiatives.

Richard Lace and David Hadden – two graduates who joined the scheme last year – are spear-heading the Graduates for Technology recruitment tours which are taking place at colleges and universities around the UK throughout October and November.

More information about the BBC engineering and technology trainee scheme can be found at <a href=http://www.bbc.co.uk/jobs/gradrecruit> The BBC site</a>

On the web