BP HAILS NORTH SEA COST-SAVING

BP said last week that its latest £1.6bn North Sea development had already improved on the benchmarks set by its record-breaking Andrew project, which came on stream six months early and more than £80m under budget in June last year. The three platform jackets for the Eastern Trough Area Project (Etap) – an integrated development […]

BP said last week that its latest £1.6bn North Sea development had already improved on the benchmarks set by its record-breaking Andrew project, which came on stream six months early and more than £80m under budget in June last year.

The three platform jackets for the Eastern Trough Area Project (Etap) – an integrated development of seven small fields – were built more efficiently than the support structure for the Andrew platform, said Dave Blackwood, BP’s asset manager for the Etap project.

Blackwood said all three Etap jackets – a 7,500-tonne structure for the central processing facility on the Marnock field and units of 3,500 and 3,000 tonnes – had been fabricated for fewer man-hours per tonne than the 66 man-hours for the Andrew jacket.

He would not confirm that the Etap structures, the last two of which sailed out for installation in the last week, had been been built for 50 man-hours per tonne but said he hoped the project would also surpass the standards set by Andrew for platform topsides and pipelines.

However, Blackwood cautioned that Etap still had a long way to go before scheduled first oil in the fourth quarter of 1998.