Concurrent problems

I work in the electronics industry and it has become apparent that the practice of concurrent engineering causes problems in projects in which there might be a degree of technical risk. The reason why it can be difficult to get engineers to release information early is usually that they are not yet happy with the […]

I work in the electronics industry and it has become apparent that the practice of concurrent engineering causes problems in projects in which there might be a degree of technical risk.

The reason why it can be difficult to get engineers to release information early is usually that they are not yet happy with the design.

Early shortcomings are not resolved fully, causing problems in the later stages of test and manufacture.

A well-designed product will be in use for many years, and it behoves all engineers to get it right, and not to release a design until conscience allows.

One final point. I have just received my 13 November edition of The Engineer and have read the glowing article about the new Land Rover assembly line. In particular, the automated paint shop applying a water-based base coat.

I seem to remember two recent BBC TV Watchdog programmes, one concerning vehicle corrosion problems, and the other about damage to water-based car-paintwork caused by bird droppings. Is this the case?

{{John BaxendaleChief EngineerUltra Electronics Card Systems}}