Discrimination puts women off engineering

Discrimination and a poor image are driving women from careers in engineering, a conference aimed at getting more women into the profession heard this week. Marie-Noelle Barton, manager of the Engineering Council’s Women into Science and Engineering campaign, said firms are often biased against female graduates, asking them what they would do when they had […]

Discrimination and a poor image are driving women from careers in engineering, a conference aimed at getting more women into the profession heard this week.

Marie-Noelle Barton, manager of the Engineering Council’s Women into Science and Engineering campaign, said firms are often biased against female graduates, asking them what they would do when they had children, for example.

Many women are put off by engineering’s dirty image, and fail to see the high-tech job openings, said Barton.

The education system may be to blame too, the campaign believes. It claimed school careers advisers often fail to tell science-minded girls about engineering jobs.

But Janice Cook, general secretary of the National Association of Careers and Guidance Teachers, said: `If girls aren’t choosing engineering it’s because of the image, not the advice given.’