EEF’s departure gives Quinco a real image crisis

What next for Quinco? With last week’s resignation of the Engineering Employers’ Federation from the board, a serious blow has been dealt to the credibility of the successor organisation to the Year of Engineering Success while it is still finding its feet. The EEF had been a reluctant signatory to the body in the first […]

What next for Quinco? With last week’s resignation of the Engineering Employers’ Federation from the board, a serious blow has been dealt to the credibility of the successor organisation to the Year of Engineering Success while it is still finding its feet.

The EEF had been a reluctant signatory to the body in the first place, but this is not the only indication that all is not well. Quinco has only attracted just over half its target quota of sponsors from industry to back this mission, suggesting that something is wrong with its message.

Clearly there is a job to be done, given that virtually everyone in the engineering profession agrees on the need to improve the image of engineering and its attractiveness as a potential career. But the EEF argues that there are already enough national bodies doing their bit, making Quinco superfluous, even in the co-ordinating role which has been suggested by the Engineering and Marine Training Authority.

The EEF goes on to point out that the Year of Engineering Success had most impact at a regional level. The suggestion that Quinco should redefine its role as a regional body seems worthy of consideration.

Two things are clear: first, it is a poor reflection on the profession that it is unable to reach a consensus on the pressing issue of how to tackle engineering’s image problem; and second, unless Quinco can define a role for itself which will demonstrably inspire the confidence and gain the backing of the whole of the engineering profession, it is unlikely to have much impact on the public at large.