Flat-screen work is held up by points of detail

A deal to put highly advanced light emitting polymer display technology into production is being delayed by the failure of the two parties to agree details. Lawyers acting for patent holder Cambridge Display Technologies and an undisclosed company, believed to be European, are attempting to thrash out fine points of a non-exclusive license agreement. It […]

A deal to put highly advanced light emitting polymer display technology into production is being delayed by the failure of the two parties to agree details.

Lawyers acting for patent holder Cambridge Display Technologies and an undisclosed company, believed to be European, are attempting to thrash out fine points of a non-exclusive license agreement. It will be the second for Cambridge based CDT.

The first, in September, gave electronics giant Philips a head start in the race to develop displays made from LEPs. These semiconductor materials can be used to make displays that are flatter, thinner and use less energy than others. Applications include backlit displays in mobile phones and, ultimately, in television sets.

Further announcements from CDT are expected to include venture capital funding and other technology licensing arrangements. When he took over last year, chief executive Danny Chapchal made it clear he was looking to amortise research and development costs through fund-raising rather than manufacturing.