Inventor claims new engine gives power boost

An engine based on two basic parts could be `the kiss of death’ to existing piston-driven and turbine systems, its inventor claims. Tony Cuthbert says the hybrid turbine motor greatly improves on the power to weight ratio of traditional piston engines. `This device could be used to power any vehicle from a car to large […]

An engine based on two basic parts could be `the kiss of death’ to existing piston-driven and turbine systems, its inventor claims.

Tony Cuthbert says the hybrid turbine motor greatly improves on the power to weight ratio of traditional piston engines.

`This device could be used to power any vehicle from a car to large ship at a fraction of the cost,’ he says.

The most basic form of the engine consists of two similar fixed discs with waveform tracks machined into them. Each contains a number of inlet ports. A rotating disc with valves, located to coincide with the waveform tracks, lies between the fixed discs. The rotating disc has a corresponding number of outlet ports and is fixed on a drive shaft. The valves allow liquid or steam to be transferred between the waveform track and the outlet port.

Heat, liquid, steam, or gas can be used to power the turbine. The system can work in two ways.

The first involves high-pressure fluid entering the chamber formed by the waveform track, slide valves and rotating disc through the inlet ports. The fluid forces the rotating disc around. As the disc rotates the inlet port is closed causing the valves to open, releasing pressure through the outlet ports.

The second method feeds water into the chamber, which is vaporised by heating the fixed discs. The high-pressure steam generated forces the rotating disc around, closes the inlet port and opens the outlet port. `This would work with a compression ignition or spark ignition system,’ Cuthbert says.

The machine can be configured using multiple waveforms, discs and valves, and could be used for direct, indirect or magnetically-driven drives.

Experimental research data (which can be accessed at: www.cuthbert-physics. com), suggests that one of Cuthbert’s engines, weighing just a fifth of a petrol or diesel engine, could produce six to seven times the power of its rival.