Jaguar leaps the years

Like the new Jaguar? Some of the earliest reports have been far from complementary. The shape, of course, pays homage to the famous Mark II, and the genius of Sir William Lyons, who engineered elegant Jaguars whose surfaces, to a large degree, simply followed the lines of the engineering beneath, and looked beautiful for it. […]

Like the new Jaguar? Some of the earliest reports have been far from complementary. The shape, of course, pays homage to the famous Mark II, and the genius of Sir William Lyons, who engineered elegant Jaguars whose surfaces, to a large degree, simply followed the lines of the engineering beneath, and looked beautiful for it.

Today’s version succeeds in recalling many of the features of the Mark II, but the result, in 1998, is a bit of a shock. Carrying on a design tradition is fine, if as BMW claims to do with its ‘DNA’ advertising campaign you move the tradition on in small steps with each model. The problem, though, is to try to ‘evolve’ a car design in one go across a time span of 40 years. That’s what the new London taxi has attempted to do. And it’s what Jaguar’s done. It takes some getting used to.