Lighting institutions set date for talks on merger

Lighting engineers are to begin talks in September on merging their professional bodies, the latest in a series of mergers by engineering institutions to cut overheads, reduce duplication and offer better value for money to members. The move has come from the 2,000-strong Institution of Lighting Engineers, which has asked for talks with the similar-sized […]

Lighting engineers are to begin talks in September on merging their professional bodies, the latest in a series of mergers by engineering institutions to cut overheads, reduce duplication and offer better value for money to members.

The move has come from the 2,000-strong Institution of Lighting Engineers, which has asked for talks with the similar-sized group of lighting engineers that make up part of the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers.

ILFpresident Patrick Baldrey said that negotiations would have to `proceed with sensitivity’. `There are sacred cows and vested interests on both sides,’ he said.

Mergers among small institutions are becoming a common trend, as the margins between engineering disciplines become less clearly defined.

In 1998, the Institute of Mining Engineers and the Institution of Mining & Metallurgy voted to merge, taking joint membership to around 7,000, while the 40,000-strong Institution of Incorporated Engineers was formed as a result of a three-way merger earlier that year.

Plans to merge the Institution of Plant Engineers and the Institute of Road Transport Engineers were announced in May 1998.