Mini motor for nanocar

In follow-on work to last year’s invention of the world’s first single-molecule car, chemists at RiceUniversity have produced the first motorised version of their tiny nanocar.“We want to construct things from the bottom up, one molecule at a time, in much the same way that biological cells use enzymes to assemble proteins and other supermolecules,” […]

In follow-on work to last year’s invention of the world’s first single-molecule car, chemists at RiceUniversity have produced the first motorised version of their tiny nanocar.



“We want to construct things from the bottom up, one molecule at a time, in much the same way that biological cells use enzymes to assemble proteins and other supermolecules,” said lead researcher James M. Tour, the Chao Professor of Chemistry, professor of mechanical engineering and materials science and professor of computer science. “Everything that’s produced through biology, from the tallest redwood to largest whale, is built one molecule at a time. Nanocars and other synthetic transporters may prove to be a suitable alternative for bottom-up systems where biological methods aren’t practical.”



The motorised model of the nanocar is powered by light. Tour’s group modified its rotating motor, a molecular framework that was developed by Ben L. Feringa at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, so that it would attach in-line with the nanocar’s chassis. When light strikes the motor, it rotates in one direction, pushing the car along like a paddlewheel.



The nanocar consists of a rigid chassis and four alkyne axles that spin freely and swivel independently of one another. The four buckyball wheels that were used in the original version of the nanocar drained energy from the motor and were replaced with spherical molecules of carbon, hydrogen and boron called p-carborane.



Initial tests carried out in a bath of toluene solvent found that the motor rotates as designed when it’s struck by light. Follow-up tests are underway to determine whether the motorised car can be driven across a flat surface,



The nanocars, which measure just 3-by-4 nanometres, are about the same width as a strand of DNA, but much shorter than DNA. About 20,000 of these nanocars could be parked, side-by-side, across the diameter of human hair. They are the first nanoscale vehicles with an internal motor.