Minorities still facing racial bias

British-born, black African male graduates are only one seventh as likely to get jobs as their white colleagues, according to new research. This is despite a higher level of educational achievement among black African men than any other minority ethnic group. British-born, male Caribbean graduates were twice as likely to be unemployed as their white […]

British-born, black African male graduates are only one seventh as likely to get jobs as their white colleagues, according to new research.

This is despite a higher level of educational achievement among black African men than any other minority ethnic group.

British-born, male Caribbean graduates were twice as likely to be unemployed as their white counterparts after graduation.

Employment prospects were found to be even worse for British men of Pakistani or Bangladeshi descent. Indian men came closest to matching the employment prospects of white males, falling only slightly behind.

The figures come despite the fact that members of all minority ethnic groups are more likely to stay on at school after the minimum leaving age of 16 than white teenagers. `Young men of African origin are especially likely to stay on and obtain good qualifications – yet are more likely to face unemployment,’ said Richard Berthoud, the study’s author.

A spokeswoman for the Commission for Racial Equality said senior managers in organisations had to take responsibility for ending racial bias.

`Employers must realise that it is to their benefit to make the most of the diverse pool of talent available to them,’ she said.