MoD all set to tune in to a Dynamic future

CDC Systems is to create 60 new engineering jobs after winning a £1.7bn contract to supply the British army with a new radio communication system. CDC Systems UK, a subsidiary of US firm General Dynamics, is hoping to recruit engineers to work on the Bowman project, to replace the army’s 25-year-old Clansman radios. Paul Coderre, […]

CDC Systems is to create 60 new engineering jobs after winning a £1.7bn contract to supply the British army with a new radio communication system.

CDC Systems UK, a subsidiary of US firm General Dynamics, is hoping to recruit engineers to work on the Bowman project, to replace the army’s 25-year-old Clansman radios.

Paul Coderre, Bowman consultant for CDC, said the company is looking for electrical and electrical-mechanical engineers – particularly those with experience in project management.

‘The project managers will be supervising the performance of our 15 major subcontractors, and monitoring their engineering work,’ he said.

CDC is recruiting engineers to work at its new headquarters and army communications research and development centre in south Wales. The company is hoping to recruit professionals from the local area, and is also in contact with some engineers who were recently made redundant from losing contract bidder Thales.

Engineers will be expected to check on the progress of the sub-contractors at each stage of the project, which will take seven years to complete. ‘It takes quite a while to spend £1.7bn,’ said Coderre.

CDC will supply over 48,000 radios and 30,000 computers to the Ministry of Defence, and will refit vehicles and train army personnel in using the new systems. The company has recently produced a similar system for the Canadian armed forces.

Engineers will lead project teams, made up of representatives from the Ministry of Defence, sub-contractors and suppliers, to ensure all parts of the communication system perform to their specifications.

‘It’s the scale of the project that makes it different,’ said Coderre. ‘we will be installing radios in vehicles, so we are not only concerned about the performance of the radios themselves, but also their performance within the vehicles.’

The teams will have to ensure the radios do not suffer from interference or radiation, and consider all aspects of health and safety. ‘It really is the kind of project engineers love – it covers all disciplines,’ Coderre added.