MoD rebuff to refurbished Scorpion

A small British spare parts company is trying to break through what it sees as Ministry of Defence indifference to marketing a modernised version of the Scorpion light tank. Repaircraft, based in Cranleigh, Surrey, last week launched the Scorpion 2000. The refurbished armoured vehicle differs from the original in having an additional power unit at […]

A small British spare parts company is trying to break through what it sees as Ministry of Defence indifference to marketing a modernised version of the Scorpion light tank.

Repaircraft, based in Cranleigh, Surrey, last week launched the Scorpion 2000. The refurbished armoured vehicle differs from the original in having an additional power unit at the rear, which allows the operator to avoid starting the main engine to provide power for the tank’s systems when stationary.

One potential market for the tank could be the former Soviet Baltic republics, which could be attracted by the Scorpion 2000’s basic price of £200,000 each. Managing director Adrian Stainton said efforts to sell the vehicle to the MoD have been rebuffed.

Repaircraft has a stock of Scorpions bought as surplus from the Belgian Army. The company is also offering a modernised version of the Spartan troop carrier, which uses the same chassis as the Scorpion.