Nissan trials system which lets cars see what’s round the next corner

A car that can see round corners is to undergo trials in October this year, as part of a major transport safety initiative in Japan. The technology, developed by Nissan, will remove uncertainty facing drivers emerging from tight junctions or from driveways onto busy streets. Miniature video cameras mounted on both sides of the front […]

A car that can see round corners is to undergo trials in October this year, as part of a major transport safety initiative in Japan.

The technology, developed by Nissan, will remove uncertainty facing drivers emerging from tight junctions or from driveways onto busy streets.

Miniature video cameras mounted on both sides of the front bumper send images to a dashboard display monitor, providing the driver with a clear view to the left and the right.

Even if the driver is not paying attention, the system can warn of approaching pedestrians and vehicles. If the camera detects movement an indicator on the dashboard lights up to alert the driver.

The system is being tested as part of a Japanese Ministry of Transport advanced vehicle safety project which is running throughout this autumn.

It was developed as part of Nissan’s Triple Safety philosophy, based on three principles: information safety, forewarning the driver of danger; control safety, assisting the driver in avoiding that danger; and impact safety, helping to reduce injury in the event of an accident.

Japanese road congestion has led to investigations into a range of new technologies for `intelligent’ cars and motorways, including Honda’s `autopilot’ system (The Engineer, 19 May).

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