ON COURSE

Industrial history is constantly growing, railways, coal mines, windmill sails, clocks and even first generation computers need specialist preservation. Yet the skills needed to undertake conservation projects are in decline, and if survivors of the Industrial Age do not pass on their skills soon, they may be lost. The school of engineering at Brighton University, […]

Industrial history is constantly growing, railways, coal mines, windmill sails, clocks and even first generation computers need specialist preservation. Yet the skills needed to undertake conservation projects are in decline, and if survivors of the Industrial Age do not pass on their skills soon, they may be lost.

The school of engineering at Brighton University, in partnership with the British Engineerium at Hove, has therefore created a new MSc in Industrial Heritage Conservation, to meet the need for professionally-trained and properly qualified industrial preservationists (starts September, University of Brighton). The course is based on a definition of industrial heritage which includes the sites, equipment, techniques and products of the manufacturing industry. Students who have recently completed degrees in subjects such as engineering, or engineers who are keen to change career paths, in particular those who have recently lost employment in the automotive industry, are among those targetted by the course organizers.

As well as academics from the university, the course will draw on the expertise of the Science Museum, the National Maritime Museum, English Heritage, the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings, and the Imperial War Museum. Contact John Walter, Brighton University, 01273 600 900.

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