Power equipment firm needs bright sparks

Power supply equipment firm HiTek Power is recruiting electronics engineers as part of a long-term expansion plan. Currently a small business, HiTek is looking for engineers as part of its five-year growth plan, which includes expansion of its sites in the UK, Europe, and the US. ‘We are looking for engineers to help build up […]

Power supply equipment firm HiTek Power is recruiting electronics engineers as part of a long-term expansion plan.

Currently a small business, HiTek is looking for engineers as part of its five-year growth plan, which includes expansion of its sites in the UK, Europe, and the US.

‘We are looking for engineers to help build up the business,’ said Denise Potter, human resources manager. ‘At the moment we are only a small company, but we plan to be a good deal bigger, through worldwide expansion, as well as the continuing growth of our facilities in Europe, and on the East and West coast of the US.’

HiTek, which designs and manufactures switch mode power supply units for use across a wide range of sectors – including medical and science equipment, communications, and instrumentation – employs just 140 people at the moment.

However, it has just opened an office in Frankfurt, has a site in Boston, and a manufacturing plant in California which is growing rapidly.

HiTek is looking for design engineers with experience in switch mode power supply, but is struggling against a shortage of experienced electronics engineers.

‘We are actively recruiting all the time, because of the scarcity of engineers in the field,’ said Potter.

There is also a perception among some graduates that the electronics industry is not as exciting as other sectors, such as the telecommunications and IT industries.

‘This may account for the increasing shortage of experienced professionals,’ Potter added. ‘Graduates tend to enter the latest markets, such as telecoms or IT, rather than our more traditional analogue electronics design.’

In an attempt to tackle these skill shortages, the company is working with universities and schools to promote electronics design among young people, and is also offering Modern Apprenticeships.

‘We have to improve the knowledge and understanding of what we are doing,’ said Potter. ‘There is little point in criticising the skill shortages if we are not doing anything about it.’