Safety major now in control

Pilz is claiming a major advance with the introduction of its PSS4000 automation system that integrates a broad range of machine control and safety functions, including motion control, diagnostics and visualisation. The system, it said, was developed in r

London – Pilz is claiming a major advance with the introduction of its PSS4000 automation system that integrates a broad range of machine control and safety functions, including motion control, diagnostics and visualisation. The system, it said, was developed in response to customers’ requirements for a complete solution, comprising safety and standard control technology.

The PSS4000 enables automation functions in the areas of safety to be readily implemented across a whole range of industries – from small to medium-sized machinery, right through to large-scale plants, said Pilz. The system, it added, facilitates automation design, programming and implementation across many application areas, from mechanical engineering to manufacturing industry.

The integrated system features advanced visualisation and diagnostic capabilities, which are delivered via a SafetyNET p Ethernet-based industrial fieldbus network. The software suite can also present all elements of an automation project on a single interface.

Configuration and programming of the entire decentralised control system is carried out via a single Pilz Automation Suite, the PAS4000. Material can easily be copied and reused both within a project and from one project to another, said Pilz.

Conventionally, machine designers specify the hardware then write the control program to suit. However, any changes required either during the development or after the machine has entered service are difficult to execute. With the PSS4000 and PAS4000, said Pilz, programming can start as soon as the machine’s basic functions are known, with the hardware specification following on or taking place in parallel. This saves time in the development phase and means that changes are simpler and less costly to implement.

Pilz also highlighted how its system can simplify the decentralisation of control functionalities, while the software delivers a centralised view of the project. These features are said to help users achieve greater reusability and increased standardisation, especially where identical control programs and subfunctions are used. This, in turn, allows machine elements to have a modular structure, so that identical components can be easily reused, leading to greater availability and higher productivity due to shorter reaction times across the system.

Component-oriented programming is another feature of the PAS4000. Tested software blocks for common functions are available in a library, which can be readily expanded, including with the user’s own components. This, said the company, means high reusability of pre-defined functions and a reduction in programming and engineering work.