Size problems by the yard

Modular construction, in which a vessel is built in sections in different yards and assembled later, is already employed by a number of shipyards. Some, such as those in Poland and other east-European yards, specialise in building hull sections which are joined and outfitted elsewhere. The size and scale of the Freedom Ship and Cruise […]

Modular construction, in which a vessel is built in sections in different yards and assembled later, is already employed by a number of shipyards. Some, such as those in Poland and other east-European yards, specialise in building hull sections which are joined and outfitted elsewhere.

The size and scale of the Freedom Ship and Cruise Bowl do not rule this out. The experience of the offshore industry suggests that building huge structures and towing them to a single assembly site is not impossible.

Refitting or repairing a mega-cruise ship could be an altogether more difficult task. In recent years it has become clear that owners of all types of radically different vessels can experience problems finding facilities for routine repair and maintenance.

The unique design of Stena Line’s HSS1500 fast ferries severely restricts yards that are equipped to work on them. The first of the class, Stena Explorer, had to return to the Finnish shipyard that built it for its first overhaul.

P&O’s Princess Cruises tacitly admits that there are not many yards that can dry dock the Grand Princess if it needs emergency repairs. The main problem with the Cruise Bowl would be its breadth, which is 10 times that of the Grand Princess much wider than any existing dry docks could accommodate.