STFC components for SESAME project

High-tech components from the world’s first dedicated synchrotron light source will be used by a Middle Eastern collaboration to construct experimental beamlines for research into materials and life sciences. The components were gifted by the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) for the SESAME project (Synchrotron light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle […]

High-tech components from the world’s first dedicated synchrotron light source will be used by a Middle Eastern collaboration to construct experimental beamlines for research into materials and life sciences.

The components were gifted by the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) for the SESAME project (Synchrotron light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East).

The project brings together the governments and scientists of Bahrain, Cyprus, Egypt, Jordan, Iran, Israel, Pakistan, the Palestinian Territories and Turkey, with representatives from another 11 countries (including the UK) participating as observers to provide help and advice. SESAME will be the region’s first major international research centre and will be built in Jordan under the umbrella of UNESCO.

The high-tech components were originally from the Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) in Daresbury.

Prof Keith Mason, chief executive of STFC, said: ‘The UK was the first country to develop a dedicated synchrotron light source and I am pleased that the donation of some of its components will enable further scientific research and collaboration between the nations involved in the SESAME Project.’

Prof Samar Hasnain from the SESAME Council thanked the STFC for the donation and added: ‘[This equipment] will allow the next generation of their scientists to carry out world-class fundamental scientific research.’