Students might prefer practical instruction

The editorial (19 June) about the Engineering Council’s new edition of Standards and Routes to Registration (Sartor) states that `students with the equivalent of three Cs (at A-level) would join a three-year degree leading to incorporated status’. Not so. Three Cs (or equivalent) are the minimum for entry to a degree accredited for Chartered Engineer. […]

The editorial (19 June) about the Engineering Council’s new edition of Standards and Routes to Registration (Sartor) states that `students with the equivalent of three Cs (at A-level) would join a three-year degree leading to incorporated status’. Not so. Three Cs (or equivalent) are the minimum for entry to a degree accredited for Chartered Engineer. Even this minimum, which is quite modest, applies to only 80% of each entry.

There is no foundation to the news story that `proposals to determine whether students are more suited to degrees leading to chartered or incorporated engineer on the basis of A-level results could be abandoned in the face of continuing opposition’.

Our requirement for entry standards has been accepted by the vast majority of the professional bodies and organisations involved. These bodies agree on the importance of ensuring students are intellectually capable of pursuing a course leading to Chartered Engineer status.

Many students and graduates aiming for Chartered Engineer status would possibly gain far more satisfaction from a different kind of degree and eventual career in which the practical implementation of engineering is stressed. Such degrees, now more widely available, lead on to Incorporated Engineer status. This career satisfaction is a result that Sartor aims to achieve.

{{Jack Levydirector for engineers’ regulationEngineering Council}}