The search is on for Britain’s engineering heroes.

As the 1997 Year of Engineering Success kicks off, The Engineer is joining with the Yes organisers to search for the brightest and best engineering talent. The Yes campaign plans a year packed with 5,000 events to persuade young people, parents and opinion formers of the importance of engineering. And it needs more engineers to […]

As the 1997 Year of Engineering Success kicks off, The Engineer is joining with the Yes organisers to search for the brightest and best engineering talent.

The Yes campaign plans a year packed with 5,000 events to persuade young people, parents and opinion formers of the importance of engineering. And it needs more engineers to get involved.

`It is up to engineers to help sell themselves. We are looking for young hero engineers to help us explain all the exciting projects they are working on,’ said Yes director general Dr Mary Harris.

Harris is looking for young people under 35 who can sell the profession and themselves, and more experienced engineers who have made significant contributions to engineering but who are not yet in the history books.

`Scientists are much more willing to talk about their work. In the UK we are very good at fundamental engineering. Engineers must help to raise the profile,’ she said.

The Yes campaign is formally launched later this month. Its flagship event is the BBC’s Tomorrow’s World Live at Birmingham’s NEC in March, when the spotlight will be on innovation in engineering. There will also be nine theme days.

The Engineer plans to profile the projects, work and successes of many of our best engineering heroes. We want to hear about the work of individual engineers and engineering teams to support the campaign. Help us to support Yes.