Year 2000 problem to get practical solution?

Intellution has taken the proverbial bull by the horns with the millennium bug. The company is offering to buy back any manufacturer’s Year 2000 non-compliant SCADA or batch software (up to £50,000) if the user replaces it with its product. Andrew Ballard, Intellution UK general manager: ‘The millennium bug is potentially devastating to the process […]

Intellution has taken the proverbial bull by the horns with the millennium bug. The company is offering to buy back any manufacturer’s Year 2000 non-compliant SCADA or batch software (up to £50,000) if the user replaces it with its product.

Andrew Ballard, Intellution UK general manager: ‘The millennium bug is potentially devastating to the process control industry because of the widespread use of scheduling and other date-related functionality. What we’re offering is a practical way in which users can address the problem.’

Asked whether changing SCADA software would provide an adequate solution, he agreed that on its own it might not. ‘But we’ve teamed up with some of the process control industry’s experts – like Boward Computer Services, Dickinson Control Systems and IEA – to provide consultancy services for those who are rightly concerned.’

* According to Independent Exhibitions’ Mark Napier, director of the CIM ’97 Show, solutions to the Year 2000 problem will be a major feature of this year’s event (4-6 November). ‘The Year 2000 problem runs through manufacturing like letters through a stick of rock. Some exhibitors will offer solutions to the problem, whilst others will offer advice on how to address it’, he said.

* On 5 September Scottish Enterprise is staging a conference at the Stakis Dunblane Hotel, Perthshire on the Year 2000 problem. Call Yvonne Anderson at the Scottish Software Federation on 01506 472200.

* Other info points include www.brainstorm.co.uk/reg/DISC, and www.iee.org.uk/2000risk/