Younger staff feel `crushed’ by excessive workloads

Younger people are struggling to cope with the demands of their jobs and often feel crushed by their workloads, according to new research by consultant Ceridian Performance Partners. Workload pressure was cited as a concern by four out of 10 people in the survey but was more of an issue for the young. While more […]

Younger people are struggling to cope with the demands of their jobs and often feel crushed by their workloads, according to new research by consultant Ceridian Performance Partners.

Workload pressure was cited as a concern by four out of 10 people in the survey but was more of an issue for the young.

While more than half of survey respondents aged over 40 disagreed or strongly disagreed with the statement: `I sometimes feel crushed by my workload’, the proportion fell to a third in the under 30 age group.

One in 10 under 30s `strongly agreed’ that their workload was too much, the research, which questioned 400 people in London, Birmingham, Manchester and Edinburgh, found.

Stress was `sometimes’ an issue for six out of 10 people across the age ranges, but maturity clearly gave people an advantage.

More than half of those over 40 said they rarely or never felt stressed, but less than a third of the younger group were able to say the same.

Engineer’s union the MSF said it recognised the picture of increased workloads and higher stress levels among its members.

Older people were likely to cope better with stress because they were `more established in their jobs and have got more of a handle on what they are doing’, a spokesman said. They also tend to be `higher up the ladder’.

`We are seeing more and more downsizing and redundancies the result of which is often that the work gets shared out among the people who are left,’ the spokesman added.

`But when people are overloaded you get less out of them. They sometimes end up doing nothing at all.’

The report supported this view, finding that young people were less likely to feel they were giving their best at work.

Only one in four young people said they always put in what they regarded as maximum effort, while more than a third agreed they did not always give their best.

Only one in five of their older colleagues felt the same. Almost 65% denied that they ever gave less than their best.

Dominique Hammond writes for Personnel Today