Rolls signs $2 billion Gulfstream deal

Rolls-Royce will deliver up to 600 upgraded BR710 engines, 300 firm and 300 options, to power the new twin-engine Gulfstream V-SP business jet aircraft.

Rolls-Royce has signed an agreement with Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation for up to $2 billion worth of engine business over the next 10 years.

Rolls-Royce will deliver up to 600 upgraded BR710 engines, 300 firm and 300 options, to power the new twin-engine Gulfstream V-SP business jet aircraft. The BR710, produced by Rolls-Royce Deutschland at its Dahlewitz facility near Berlin, is the sole powerplant for the Gulfstream V and Gulfstream V-SP.

Two Rolls-Royce BR710 turbofans powered the GV-SP during its first flight on 31 August 2001, four weeks ahead of schedule. The aircraft and engines exceeded expectations and flight-testing is proceeding toward Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aircraft and engine certification in the fourth quarter of 2002.

The Gulfstream V-SP offers a range of 6,750 nautical miles at .80 Mach, a 250-mile improvement over the Gulfstream V, which provides an extra margin of performance, not only on ultra-long range flights, but also on shorter-range, higher-speed missions. The GV-SP is capable of flying 5,000 nm at .87 Mach – a 400-mile advantage over the GV – and 6,000 nm at .85 Mach, a 300-mile advantage.

Certificated in August 1996, the BR710 is also the powerplant for the Bombardier Global Express ultra long-range business jet and the Bombardier Global 5000 super large business jet. Additionally, it has been selected to power the BAE Systems Nimrod MRA4, the UK’s new maritime reconnaissance aircraft. Another member of the BR700 family, the larger BR715, is the sole powerplant for the Boeing 717 passenger jet.

Today’s agreement extends a relationship between the two companies which began in 1958 when the Gulfstream I aircraft entered into service, powered by the Rolls-Royce Dart engine. Since then, Rolls-Royce has delivered more than 2,500 Dart, Spey, Tay and BR710 engines for the complete range of Gulfstream aircraft.

In 2001, the corporate aircraft engine market was worth US$2.5 billion, of which Rolls-Royce had approximately a 32% total value market share. The corporate aircraft sector covers the entire range of products from 6-seater entry-level business jets requiring 1,800lb of thrust, to business jetliners requiring 27,000lb of thrust.