Wireless support for Windows

Texas Instruments and Microsoft are to collaborate to support Windows Media Audio, Video and digital rights management technology on TI’s OMAP processors.

Texas Instruments and Microsoft are to collaborate to support Windows Media Audio, Video and digital rights management (DRM) technology on TI’s DSP-based OMAP processors. The move is expected to help push advanced streaming multimedia to the next generation of wireless handsets.

Windows Media is already being used in this way in Japan. In December 2000, NTT DoCoMo launched the first commercial service that uses Windows Media to deliver streamed audio and video to cellular phones via a high-speed Personal Handyphone System (PHS) network.

These kinds of new Internet-based services will enable consumers to send and receive personal digital audio and video, and access downloaded and streamed digital music, Internet radio, short subject video, movie trailers, news clips, financial information and weather reports.

The Windows Media Audio 8 beta release, announced in December, delivers FM-quality sound at modem dial-up rates and is suited for the GPRS networks being built today in Europe and the United States.

As networks are upgraded to the 3G (UMTS) standard, the Windows Media Video 8 beta, also announced in December, will enable delivery of video too. The Windows Media Video 8 beta delivers near-VHS-quality video at rates as low as 250 Kbps and near-DVD-quality video at rates as low as 500 Kbps.