This week in 1959: Heralding a Triumph

The Triumph Herald is one of those classic cars that is loved and derided in equal measure.

Here, The Engineer reports on the birth of an icon. Designed by an Italian and built in Coventry by the Standard-Triumph company, the Triumph Herald is one of those classic cars that is loved and derided in equal measure. However, the number of vehicles still on the road almost 40 years after it rolled off the production line for the last time is testament to its enduring appeal, if not its design.

The Engineer wrote that one of the primary objectives in the development of the vehicle was ‘redressing the increase in the cost of upkeep compared to the cost of original manufacture that has occurred in recent years’.

Hence, the Herald had a separate chassis rather than being of monocoque construction. ‘The new car is not of integral construction but has a backbone frame onto which the sections of the body are bolted,’ the magazine reported. ‘The cost of accident repairs also should be reduced by the construction of the body in sections, which are bolted to each other and the frame: six out of seven body sections are common to both saloon and fixed head coupé.’

‘In addition, those parts of the body which, in the absence of bumpers are most likely to suffer damage, are arranged to be accessible and can if necessary be removed by drilling out the spot welds securing them.’

The article continued that the use of a new universal joint packed with enough lubrication to last through its service life means that routine repair should be less costly since the car would only require servicing every 12,000 miles.

Jon Excell