Microsoft targets CDMA

Microsoft has announced that its Windows Powered Smartphone and Pocket PC software will support CDMA and broadband CDMA (1xRTT) networks later this year.

On the eve of the 2003 International Consumer Electronics Show, Microsoft has announced that its Windows Powered Smartphone and Pocket PC software will support CDMA and broadband CDMA (1xRTT) networks later this year.

The announcement doesn’t really come as a big surprise. In January 2002, Sierra Wireless disclosed that it had signed a Joint Development Agreement with Microsoft to develop tighter integration between Sierra Wireless’ Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) products and the Pocket PC software platform. Under terms of that agreement, the parties agreed to share resources and to develop versions of Microsoft’s popular Pocket PC and Smartphone 2002 software platforms.

Microsoft has been working closely with leading CDMA companies that expressed their support for the ‘new’ announcement.

‘Samsung is pleased to be working with Microsoft to bring new CDMA devices, such as our i700, to market in the first half of 2003. Consumers and business professionals will be able to enjoy the familiar Microsoft interface on a Samsung CDMA wireless device with the benefit of a colour screen and an integrated camera,’ said Peter Skarzynski, senior vice president of the wireless terminals division at Samsung.

‘Microsoft’s Windows Powered software for CDMA networks will allow Hitachi’s Multimedia Communicator based on Pocket PC Phone Edition to bring applications such as e-mail, photos to CDMA network subscribers,’ said Shigeru Matsuoka, general manager of the Mobile Information & Communication Appliance Division of the Ubiquitous Platforms Systems Group at Hitachi.

Microsoft’s investment in CDMA is in response to the technology’s growth both in the US, where CDMA is the most widely deployed network, and abroad, where CDMA adoption has increased 31% since last year.