‘Wireless-internet-on-a-chip’

Intel has announced a new cellular processor that, it claims, is the first to combine the key components of today’s cellular phones and handheld computers onto a single piece of silicon.

Intel has announced a new cellular processor that uses advanced ‘wireless-Internet-on-a-chip’ technology.

The processor is claimed to be the first to combine the key components of today’s cellular phones and handheld computers onto a single piece of silicon – promising to bring advanced functionality, longer battery life and more innovative phone designs to mainstream phones.

Called the Intel PXA800F cellular processor, it is a key component of Intel’s Personal Internet Client Architecture (Intel PCA), Intel’s development blueprint for designing wireless handheld communication devices that combine voice communications and Internet access capabilities.

The cellular processor features a low-power processor running at 312 MHz based on the Intel XScale technology with four megabytes of integrated Intel On-Chip Flash memory and 512 kilobytes (KB) of SRAM. In addition, it includes a 104 MHz signal processor using the Intel MicroSignal architecture with 512 KB of integrated Intel On-Chip Flash memory and 64 KB of SRAM, resulting in a complete system on a single chip for advanced GSM/GPRS cellular networks.

The PXA800F is sampling today with production volumes expected in the third quarter of 2003. Products using the new processors will be available later this year, or early next year.

The device has a suggested list price of $35 in 10,000 unit quantities.

On the web