If looks could kill

The US Navy recently began flight testing a technology that is said to allow aircraft crews to aim weapons and sensors by looking at targets.

The US Navy recently began F/A-18E/F Super Hornet flight testing of the Joint Helmet-Mounted Cueing System (JHMCS), which is said to allow aircraft crews to aim weapons and sensors by looking at targets.

JHMCS, an integral part of the High Off-Boresight Seeker (HOBS) system, has been developed by Boeing-Vision Systems’ International team and is said to allow users to track and attack targets more quickly than enemies that don’t have the capabilities it provides.

The HOBS system, a combination of JHMCS and AIM-9X, an advanced short-range dogfight weapon that can intercept airborne targets located at high off-boresight lines-of-sight relative to the shooter, is said to result in a weapon that can attack and destroy nearly any airborne enemy seen by the pilot.

JHMCS is said to work by combining a magnetic head tracker with a display projected onto the pilot’s visor, giving the pilot a targeting device that can be used to aim sensors and weapons wherever the pilot is looking.

With JHMCS, the pilot can aim the radar, air-to-air missiles, infrared sensors, and air-to-ground weapons by pointing his or her head at the target and pressing a switch on the flight controls.

Additionally, the pilot can view any desired data, such as airspeed, altitude, target range, while ‘heads-up’, eliminating the need to look into the cockpit during visual air combat.

The JHMCS will be deployed on F-15, F-16, F/A-18, and F-22 aircraft.

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