Image processing has some clear advantages

Increased accuracy, higher speed and advanced colour shade processing technology are just some of the advantages attributed to Keyence’s CV700 image processing system.

Increased accuracy, higher speed and advanced colour shade processing technology are just some of the advantages attributed to Keyence’s new CV700 image processing system.

One of the principle disadvantages of conventional binary processing, or grey scale processing as it’s often known, has been the inability of products to recognise contrast effectively. The new Keyence CV700 overcomes this disadvantage through its colour shade processing system. By using brightness data in addition to colour data, the separation between black and green and white and yellow, which to-date has been difficult to recognise using monochrome systems, is overcome.

This technology improves edge recognition, and when combined with sub-pixel processing, reliable measurement is consistently achieved. Accuracy of measurement is even maintained when monitoring curved, reflective surfaces where subtle changes in colour or illumination would ‘trip-up’ conventional machine vision systems.

The CV700 controller, which boasts an integral TFT colour LCD monitor, can save or read 128 inspection settings or 122 images. These can be saved on a removable 32 megabyte CompactFlash memory card to facilitate product change-overs etc. Up to 8 images that do not meet pre-defined criteria can be saved on the controller’s internal memory. Two cameras can be connected to the controller, which can provide increased inspection accuracy by magnifying the two images and using them together.

Keyence engineers have paid particular attention to ensure that the CV700 is easy to programme. There are a range of pre-set application programmes, which are available from the menu, accessed by panel keys or a special remote console.

The CV700 is being used in many new applications including checking the dimensions of manufactured parts, checking robotic handling and even measuring the pitch between connector leads.

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