In better shape

Raindrop Geomagic has been awarded a Phase II research grant for digital shape sampling and processing technology that promises to have a profound impact on product development.


The US National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded Raindrop Geomagic a Phase II research grant for digital shape sampling and processing (DSSP) technology that promises to have a profound impact on product development.



Under Phase I of the NSF grant, Raindrop Geomagic used Morse Theory research to create a structured representation of a computer model by distinguishing between flat and highly curved feature surfaces.



Expanded research in Phase II will include work to automatically construct a natural structure of the resulting CAD model, identify different surface attributes and fillet types, and provide a more efficient and automated process for creating surfaces with high accuracy and smoothness.



The proposed technology will enable users to easily create accurate representations of scanned physical parts. According to a statement, this will provide an efficient closed-loop between physical parts and their digital representations at any phase of a product life cycle.



Commercial applications for this technology include design and analysis of complex shapes such as turbine blades, transmission housings, and engine blocks; creating digital inventory of legacy parts; historical preservation; mass customisation; and biometric shape reconstruction.



“The ability to automatically produce highly accurate surface models from scans of physical objects is a key component in DSSP,” says Dr. Michael Facello, principal investigator for Raindrop Geomagic’s research. “Our surfacing research has the potential to reduce tooling design cycles from months to days, improve quality through better analysis, and enable product customisation on a mass scale.”