Seeking recruits and awarding structures

News editor

The nominees for this year’s Structural Awards showcase designs on the cutting edge of engineering

Briefing starts the week with the offer of good luck to Alstom who this week set up shop at London’s Waterloo station in a bid to lure recruits and spread the word about the company’s prowess.

This Wednesday the rail and energy company will be present on Waterloo’s concourse and hopes to engage with commuters about its involvement with London’s future through its considerable rail commitments in the capital. 

These include maintenance contracts to overhaul and maintain the Northern Line fleet, the daily maintenance of West Coast Main Line Pendolinos, and the award one of Crossrail’s largest contracts for tunnel fit-out, and two further contracts for power supplies.

Consequently, the company is looking to hire around 200 London-based engineers, with graduates and apprentices forming a significant portion of this figure.

Alstom’s stand will be in the concourse at Waterloo Station from 0630-1930. Briefing wishes them the best of luck in halting the blinkered, swift-footed commuter hoards who alight from their trains and move through stations with the same unforgiving ferocity as a tornado.

Alstom’s current vacancies can be found here. Apprentice or graduate roles can be found here.

British summers, like the last two series of CSI: Las Vegas, often show fleeting glimpses of brilliance but sadly revert to the kind of mediocrity that has one thinking things were better in years gone by. Then what happens? A sustained period of summer sun and high temperatures that has many looking forward to cooler days afforded by the autumn.

It’s those very days that Briefing looks to now, offering a pictorial glimpse at some of the shortlisted entries in this year’s Institution of Structural Engineers’ Structural Awards 2013.

The winners, to be chosen from entrants with projects in the UK, Germany, Georgia, China and Antarctica, will be announced at an awards ceremony in London on 15 November 2013.

In publicity material Y.K. Cheng, president of The Institution of Structural Engineers said, ‘Structural engineers make an absolutely vital contribution ensuring that our urban environments are safe and secure yet their work often goes unrecognised.

‘The Institution of Structural Engineers holds The Structural Awards each year to showcase the dizzying variety of challenging environments in which engineers work and the highly complex structures they help to raise. 

‘The aim is to recognise the astonishing range of skills that characterise our global profession, raise awareness among the general public, and encourage young people into exciting structural engineering careers.’

Four of the shortlisted entries are shown below and the full list is available here.

The two leaning towers, 234m and 194m tall, linked together by a 15 storey cantilevered “overhang” and a 10 storey podium, posed significant structural challenges, compounded by the location in a highly seismic area. The response was to brace the facade o
Above and below: China Central Television’s new Headquarters in Beijing. Structural designer: Arup; East China Architectural&Design Research Institute. The two leaning towers, 234m and 194m tall, linked together by a 15 storey cantilevered “overhang” and a 10 storey podium, posed significant structural challenges, compounded by the location in a highly seismic area. The response was to brace the facade on all sides to form a continuous tube that is ideally suited to deal with the nature and intensity of the loading
The two leaning towers, 234m and 194m tall, linked together by a 15 storey cantilevered “overhang” and a 10 storey podium, posed significant structural challenges, compounded by the location in a highly seismic area. The response was to brace the facade o

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Sited on a pristine floating ice shelf in Antarctica, the world’s first fully-relocatable, permanently manned research station, Halley VI, sits on skis and is designed to lift itself out of rising snow. Successful delivery in one of the harshest and remot
Above and below: The Halley VI Antarctic Research Centre, Antarctica. Structural Designer: AECOM. Sited on a pristine floating ice shelf in Antarctica, the world’s first fully-relocatable, permanently manned research station, Halley VI, sits on skis and is designed to lift itself out of rising snow. Successful delivery in one of the harshest and remote locations on earth required a unique understanding of and response to the environment, scientists’ needs, restricted construction window, prefabrication, shipping constraints and maintenance limitations